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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Chemistry Graduate Overview

The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University hosts an outstanding faculty with research interests across a wide range of areas. Interdisciplinary programs in biological chemistry, materials science and computational chemistry complement more traditional areas of study in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry and biochemistry.

At Syracuse, the opportunity to do cutting-edge research in a friendly, highly interactive atmosphere offers students an outstanding environment in which to pursue graduate studies.

Programs of Study

The Chemistry Department offers three graduate degrees. In chemistry, a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree, a Master of Science (M.S.) with thesis degree, and a Master of Science (M.S.) without thesis degree. Choose from the links below for more information about each degree or program.

Ph.D. students design curricula to address their particular interests. A wide variety of courses are offered, drawn from traditional chemical, as well as biochemical and other related fields. Each student groups courses into a core curriculum, in consultation with the department graduate advisor. Usually coursework is completed during the first year.

Graduate students pursue research in a broad range of disciplines: analytical, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry, as well as biophysical, biochemical, bioorganic chemistry, and biophysics. Spectroscopy, computer analysis, and advanced structural and functional evaluation of biological materials are some areas available for concentration. Graduate students receive hands-on training in the use of state-of-the-art chemical instrumentation, and then use all equipment directly in their research

M.S. in Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers an M.S. degree with both thesis and non-thesis options.

Ph.D. in Chemistry

Ph.D. students design curricula to address their particular interests. A wide variety of courses are offered, drawn from traditional chemical, as well as biochemical and other related fields.