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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Liberal Arts Core Guidebook 2021-22

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Liberal Arts Core Curriculum #

I. Liberal Skills Requirement #

Writing Skills
3 Courses (8 to 10 credits)

  1. Studio 1: Practices of Research Academic Writing WRT 105 (or WRT 109), or ENL 211 Composition for Non-Native Speakers of English
  2. A Writing-Intensive Course An approved course in any subject (which may simultaneously satisfy other requirements)
  3. Studio 2: Critical and Writing WRT 205 (or WRT 209), or ENL 213 Advanced Academic Writing and Research for Non- Native Speakers of English

and either

Language Skills
1-3 Courses (4-12 credits)

Up through courses numbered 201

or

Quantitative Skills
2 Courses (6 to 8 credits)

Second course may simultaneously satisfy other requirements.

II. Division Perspectives Requirement (students must fulfill A, B, and C) #

A) Humanities
4 Courses (12 credits)

At least four courses from the list for the Division including a 2-Course Sequence

B) Natural Sciences and Mathematics
4 Courses (12 to 16 credits)

At least four courses from the list for the Division including a 2-Course Sequence and one lab course

C) Social Sciences
4 Courses (12 credits)

At least four courses from the list for the Division including a 2-Course Sequence

III. Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social Issues Requirements #

Three courses approved for this purpose in any subject
(9 to 12 credits)

These courses may also satisfy Writing-Intensive, IDEA, Divisional and/or Major or Minor Requirements

IV. IDEA Course Requirement #

Two courses approved for this purpose in any subject
(6 credits)

These courses may also satisfy Writing-Intensive, Critical Reflections, Divisional and/or Major or Minor Requirements

The Liberal Arts Core #

Advising and Career Services encourages all students in the College to meet an Academic Counselor to discuss questions, concerns and create academic plans to meet your goals. Call (315) 443-3150 to make an advising appointment or visit the third floor of the Hall of Languages for a drop-in. We welcome you!

A. LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION

An education in the liberal arts should do at least two essential things:

  • help students to reach a university-level mastery in the most fundamental intellectual skills needed both to explore the world and for effective communication and expression: the use of language and the use of quantitative methods.
  • help students to develop broad and integrating perspectives on the world and human experience, perspectives that draw upon the best of scholarship and research from across the fields of liberal learning. This is done by introducing students to a variety of important parts of the universe of learning and helping them to draw upon and become members of the universal community of learners.

B. THE PARTS OF THE CORE

The Liberal Arts Core is a set of principles that guides students in the selection of courses and serves to define the common core of a liberal arts education at Syracuse. It was devised and adopted by the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences to assure that each student's course of study includes the most important features of an education in the liberal arts. There are three fundamental parts to the Liberal Arts Core:

  1. The Liberal Skills Requirement
  2. The Divisional Perspectives Requirement
  3. The Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social Issues Requirement
  4. The IDEA acronym encapsulates the core concepts of Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility.

The Liberal Skills Requirement assures that each student further develops the fundamental intellectual skill of effective writing and gives the student a choice of whether to satisfy a competency requirement in quantitative skills or a second language.

The Divisional Perspectives Requirement introduces students to something of the great range of liberal fields of inquiry. A liberal education is essentially an education from a diversity of viewpoints. An education is not "free" if it confines students to one or two viewpoints, one field of study, or focuses narrowly on a single professional objective. The disciplines and interdisciplinary studies that constitute the universe of the liberal arts and sciences both complement and compete with each other in the effort to gain the most informed, balanced, and integrating perspectives on the world and human experience. Students need to get a sense of the range and power of liberal studies, and of the controversies and uncertainties that remain a challenge for these studies. In the course of surveying something of this range, they will also be put in a better position to make an informed choice regarding their majors and minors.

The Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social Issues Requirement is designed to assure that students reflect upon the relevance of the liberal arts and sciences to ethical and social issues. Every liberal field of study has great ethical and social significance. The courses that satisfy this requirement build on that fundamental fact in order to highlight that significance and to develop in students critical and self-critical intellectual habits of thought

The Liberal Arts Core is required of all students singly enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences and of all students dually enrolled in the College and the Newhouse School of Public Communications or School of Education, with one exception noted below.

Though the Liberal Arts Core is required of all students dually enrolled as first year students in the College and the Newhouse School of Public Communications, students who transfer to the dual program after their first year as singly enrolled students in the Newhouse School will satisfy general requirements for the dual degree program by completing the Newhouse Core Requirements.

UNIQUELY COUNTING RULE

Pertaining to courses that can count toward multiple majors and minors the following restrictions apply. In the following restrictions, uniquely counting means counting toward the completion of only one major or minor within the College of Arts and Sciences/Maxwell.

  1. In order to be awarded a minor in a program: A student must earn at least 6 upper division credits uniquely counting toward the minor.
  2. In order to be awarded a BA in a program: A student must earn at least 12 upper division credits uniquely counting toward the BA.
  3. In order to be awarded a BS in a program: A student must earn at least 15 upper division credits uniquely counting toward the BS.
  4. In the case of the Integrated Learning Majors, a student must earn at least 12 upper division credits uniquely counting towards the BA or BS.

Diversity and the Liberal Arts Curriculum #

DIVERSITY is one of the University’s five core values. In a college curriculum a commitment to diversity means a commitment to studies that help students to understand the variety of peoples, social groups and cultures that surround, affect, challenge and enrich them. It also seeks to help each student gain an informed and critical understanding of their own social and cultural background by setting it in the context of the backgrounds of others. Liberal education has always promoted the understanding of people of other kinds, times and cultures, but it is only in recent times that the full implications of that ideal have been recognized. Traditionally, a limited selection of social groups and cultures other than those dominant in a society were considered in a liberal course of study, but not a sufficiently rich array was included to allow an adequate, critical understanding of human diversity.

Several departments of the College have explicit missions to provide studies of women, ethnic minorities of the United States, and cultures other than those of Great Britain and Anglo-America. These departments include:

  • African American Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Languages, Literatures and Linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Kiswahili, Korean, Latin, Persian, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Turkish)
  • Geography and the Environment
  • History
  • Political Science
  • Religion
  • Sociology
  • Women’s and Gender Studies

In addition to these departments, the College of Arts and Sciences is the home of several interdisciplinary programs offering majors or minors that bring specific focus on groups and cultures that expand our understanding of human diversity:

  • Asian/Asian American Studies
  • Forensic and National Security Sciences
  • Global Political Economy
  • Global Security Studies
  • International Relations
  • Jewish Studies
  • Latino-Latin American Studies
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
  • Middle Eastern Studies
  • Native American and Indigenous Studies
  • Religion and Society
  • South Asian Studies

These departments and programs, along with others, offer over 50 undergraduate courses on US ethnic minorities, over 45 courses on women’s issues and over 200 courses on cultures and societies outside of Great Britain and Anglo-America. We encourage students to take full advantage of this rich diversity within the curriculum.

Special Note for Students with Advanced Placement Credit #

If you have received the score required on one of these C.E.E.B. Advanced Placement examinations, you will receive credit for the appropriate Syracuse University course(s) and may apply those credits earned toward completing the Liberal Arts core according to this chart; Acalog ACMS™: Academic Rules (acalogadmin.com)

If you decide to take the equivalent Syracuse University course for which you have been awarded Advanced Placement or Transfer Credit, the AP or Transfer Credit WILL BE DELETED and you will lose the credit.

If you have questions, contact the A&S Advising and Career Services.

International Baccalaureate Program - Arts and Science students who have completed courses in the IB Program should contact the A&S Advising and Career Services regarding credit toward completing the Liberal Arts Core.

Note: A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit may be accepted from all forms of extra-institutional and experiential learning, and examination programs (including Syracuse University Advanced Credit Examinations).

Note for Students Entering the College with an A.A. or A.S. Degree #

Students who have earned college credit before enrolling in Syracuse University, and intra university transfers into the College of Arts and Sciences from schools and colleges that did not require the Liberal Arts Core, should make sure that their transcripts are evaluated by the Office of Advising and Career Services and that their previous work is evaluated in the context of the Liberal Arts Core.

The following applies to students in the College of Arts and Sciences.

In evaluating a transfer student’s prior credits as they apply toward the Liberal Arts Core requirements, the College will handle them as follows:

A.A. or A.S. Completed Elsewhere

Students transferring to Syracuse who have earned an Associate of Arts (A.A.) or Associate of Science (A.S.) degree shall be required to complete the Liberal Skills and Critical Reflections Requirements of the Liberal Arts Core. Based upon prior course work such students are required to successfully complete four courses in one of the Liberal Arts Core Divisional Perspective Requirements (Humanities: Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Social Sciences) and successfully complete at least two courses from the list in each of the other two Liberal Arts Core Divisional Perspective Requirements (Humanities; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Social Sciences), including the completion of at least one natural science laboratory course.

Note: Transfer credit is not accepted for Writing Intensive, Critical Reflections, and IDEA requirements except when completed within an Associate Degree as defined in articulation agreements.

Part I - The Liberal Skills Requirement #

Quantitative skill and skill in the use of languages are indispensable elements in liberal and general education. The importance of these skills does not diminish after graduation. They are abilities that are in constant need throughout our lives for professional success, for effective and informed citizenship, and to enable us to enjoy and to contribute to the cultural and intellectual riches that depend upon them.

To satisfy the Liberal Skills Requirement of the Liberal Arts Core, students are required to achieve proficiency in writing by successfully taking either WRT 105, WRT 109, or ENL 211; and WRT 205, and a special writing-intensive course prior to taking WRT 205, WRT 209 or ENL 213.

The remainder of the requirement gives students the option of demonstrating a university-level competence in either

  • a language other than English, or
    • the use of quantitative methods to understand and solve problems.

Section A - The Writing Skills Requirement #

Students satisfy the Liberal Skills Requirement in Writing by successfully completing three courses. The first of these courses is chosen from Writing Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (WRT 105) or ENL 211 Composition for Non-Native Speakers of English. During the second year, students will take the higher level Writing Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (WRT 205) or Advanced Academic Writing and Research for Non-Native Speakers of English (ENL 213). Before WRT 205 or ENL 213 is taken, students will take a Writing-Intensive course in a subject matter other than writing, * a course that has been specially designed to give attention to developing writing ability while studying another subject matter. The list of approved, Writing-Intensive courses will be found in the next section. These courses that fulfill the Writing Intensive Course requirement must be successfully completed by the student in the academic year in which they are listed in the Liberal Arts Core Guidebook.

1. Writing Courses #

WRT 105 and WRT 205 introduce students to the kinds of writing, reading, and critical thinking that are practiced in a university and expected throughout the curriculum. Students write frequently, in varied forms, for varied purposes of inquiry and instruction. Students whose native language is not English satisfy the requirement by completing ENL 211 and 213. Additional study of English may be necessary for a student prior to entering ENL 211.

Students will take WRT 105 in the fall or spring of their first year and WRT 205 in the spring of their sophomore year. WRT 109/HNR, and WRT 209 are intensive versions of the three writing courses for students in the Honors Program. ENL 211 and 213 satisfy the requirement for students whose native language is not English. Alternatives are listed below.

WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3 CREDITS) Study and practice of writing processes, including critical reading, collaboration, revision, editing, and the use of technologies. Focuses on the aims, strategies, and conventions of academic prose, especially analysis and argumentation.

WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3 CREDITS) Study and practice of critical, research-based writing, including research methods, presentation genres, source evaluation, audience analysis, and library/online research. Students complete at least one sustained research project.

WRT 109, 209 Studio 1 and 2 (HONORS) (3 CREDITS EACH) These courses are honors versions of WRT 105 and 205 for students of demonstrated exceptional ability. WRT 109 is a prerequisite for WRT 209

ENL 211 Composition for Non-Native Speakers of English (3 CREDITS) Expository writing and reading. Students develop an awareness of the cultural and discourse expectations in written English, through reading and responding to articles on a variety of topics and writing essays of increasing complexity.

ENL 213 Advanced Academic Writing and Research for Non-Native Speakers of English (3 CREDITS) Development of critical reading and thinking skills used in scholarly research in a variety of disciplines. Students learn to summarize, synthesize, critique, and document, and use library resources effectively.

EXEMPTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES

Advanced Placement. Students who achieve a grade of 4 or 5 on their CEEB Advanced Placement Exam in Literature and Composition may register for WRT 205. Students who achieve a grade of 4 or higher on the CEEB Advanced Placement Exam in Language and Composition are not required to complete WRT 105 or WRT 205.

Project Advance. Students who have completed WRT 105. To complete the LIBERAL SKILLS in Writing requirement, these students should take WRT 205 in their sophomore year.

Transfer Credit. Course work completed at another college or university will be evaluated in a manner consistent with information provided in the Transfer Student section of this Guidebook. Transfer credit however is not accepted for the Writing Intensive requirement except when defined in articulation agreements.

2. The Writing Intensive Requirement #

Students will take a Writing-Intensive course as a prerequisite to taking WRT 205 in their fourth semester. The courses approved for satisfying this requirement are listed below. Transfer and other credit are not accepted for the Writing Intensive Requirement except when they are included in an Associate Degree as defined in articulation agreements. These courses that fulfill the Writing Intensive Course requirement must be successfully completed by the student in the academic year in which they are listed in the Liberal Arts Core Guidebook.

Courses for 2. The Writing Intensive Requirement #

African American Studies
AAS 138 Writing About Black Culture
AAS 233 The Caribbean Novel
AAS 234 African Fiction
AAS 235 African American Drama
AAS/WGS 303 Black Women Writers
AAS 305 African Orature
AAS 312 Pan Africanism
AAS 338 Creative Writing Workshop
Anthropology
ANT 185 Global Encounters: Comparing World Views & Values Cross-Culturally
ANT/SAS/WGS 324 Modern South Asian Cultures
ANT/GEO/WGS 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
ANT 467 Culture and Mental Disorders
ANT 469 Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective
Art and Music Histories
HOA 106 (honors only) Arts and Ideas II
HOM 313 Film Music
HOM 363 Opera in Society
HOM 372 Music in Multicultural America
HOM 396 Junior Seminar: Writing about Music
HOA 412 From Gothic to Goth
HOM 485 Contemporary Indigenous Soundscapes
HOM 493 Music and Identity
AAS 241/REL 281- Religious Diversity in America
-AAS/REL 345 African American Religious History
Earth and Environmental Sciences
EAR 325 Introduction to Paleobiology
English and Textual Studies
ENG 113 British Literature, Beginnings to 1789
ENG 114 British Literature, 1789 to Present
ENG 115 Topics in British Literary History
ENG 117 American Literature, Beginnings to 1865
ENG 118 American Literature, 1865 to Present
ENG 119 Topics in US Literature
ENG 121 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG 122 Introduction to the Novel
ENG 142 Narratives of Culture: Introduction to Issues of Critical Reading
ENG 146 Interpretation of New Media
ENG 151 Interpretation of Poetry
ENG 152 Interpretation of Drama
ENG 153 Interpretation of Fiction
ENG 154 Interpretation of Film
ENG 155 Interpretation of Nonfiction
ENG 156 Interpretation of Games
ENG 164 Children’s Literature
ENG 170 American Cinema, from Beginnings to Present
ENG 171 World Cinema, Beginnings to Present
ENG 172 The Literature of War and Peace
ENG 174 World Literature, Beginnings to 1000
ENG 175 World Literature, 1000 to Present
ENG 181 Class and Literary Texts
ENG 182 Race and Literary Texts
ENG 184 Ethnicity and Literary Texts
ENG/WGS 192
ENG 193 Introduction to Asian American Literature
Geography and the Environment
GEO 171 Human Geographies
GEO 219 (honors only) American Diversity and Unity
GEO 272 World Cultures
GEO 353 Geographies of Environmental Justice
GEO/ANT/WGS 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
History
HST 101 American History to 1865
HST 102 American History Since 1865
HST 111 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815
HST 112 Modern Europe: Napoleon to the Present
HST 121 Global History to 1750
HST 122 Global History from 1750
HST 201 Research Seminar in History
HST/MES 208 Middle East Since the Rise of Islam
HST 210 The Ancient World
HST 347 Modern American Politics Through Fiction
HST/QSX 348 Queering the Middle Ages?
HST 391 Mary Magdalene: History of a Legend
HST 398 Saints and Sinners in the Middle Ages
HST 399 Utopia and Institution: Early Monasticism
International Relations
IRP/PSC 412 Global Governance: The United Nations System
Jewish Studies Program
JSP/LIT/REL 131 Great Jewish Writers
JSP/REL 215 The Jewish Bible/Christian Old Testament
JSP/LIT/REL 235 Travel Narratives and Pilgrimages
JSP/LIT/REL 239 Jewish Humor and Satire
JSP/REL 307 The Temple and the Dead Sea Scrolls
JSP/REL 316 The Torah/ Pentateuch as a Scripture
JSP/LIT/REL 333 Yiddish Literature in Translation
JSP/REL 337 Shoah: Responding to the Holocaust
JSP/REL 338 American Judaism
JSP/PHI/REL 435 Modern Jewish Thought
Law in the Liberal Arts
LLA 201 Elements of Law
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
QSX/REL 323 Christianity and Sexuality
QSX/HST 348 Queering the Middle Ages?
QSX/REL 357 Queerly Religious
Literature in Translation
LIT/JSP/REL 131 Great Jewish Writers
LIT/JSP/REL 235 Travel Narratives and Pilgrimages
LIT/JSP/REL 239 Jewish Humor and Satire
LIT 256 Blood: A Cultural History
LIT/JSP/REL 333 Yiddish Literature in Translation
Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
MAX 123 Critical Issues for the United States
MAX 132 Global Community
Middle Eastern Studies
MES/HST 208 Middle East Since the Rise of Islam
MES 365/REL/SAS 367 God and Beauty in Islamic Art
Philosophy
PHI 107 Theories of Knowledge and Reality
PHI 109 Introduction to Philosophy (Honors)
PHI 111 Plato's Republic
PHI 172 Making Decisions
PHI 197 Human Nature
PHI 241/REL 292 The Human Divine in Christian and Muslim Philosophy
PHI/WGS 297 Philosophy of Feminism
PHI 319/PSC 399/REL371 God in Political Theory
PHI/REL/JSP 435 Modern Jewish Thought
Political Science
PSC 387 Ethnic Conflict
PSC 399/REL 371/PHI 319 God in Political Theory
PSC/IRP 412 Global Governance: The United Nations System
Religion
REL/SAS 123 Religious Auto/Biography
REL/JSP/LIT 131 Great Jewish Writers
REL/JSP 215 The Jewish Bible/Christian Old Testament
REL/JSP/LIT 235 Travel Narratives and Pilgrimages
REL/JSP/LIT 239 Jewish Humor and Satire
REL 261 Faith and Reason in Islamic Thought and Civilization
REL/SAS 283 India’s Religious Worlds
REL 292/PHI 241 The Human and Divine in Christian and Muslim Philosophy
REL 301 Ancient Near Eastern Religion and Cultures
REL/JSP 307 The Temple and the Dead Sea Scrolls
REL 310 Medieval Christianities
REL/JSP 316 The Torah/Pentateuch as a Scripture
REL 322 Martyrs and Saints in Christian Tradition
REL/QSX 323 Christianity and Sexuality
REL/LIT/JSP 333 Yiddish Literature in Translation
REL/JSP 337 Shoah: Responding to the Holocaust
REL/JSP 338 American Judaism
REL/QSX 357 Queerly Religious
REL/SAS 367/MES 365 God and Beauty in Islamic Art
REL 371/PHI 319/PSC 399 God in Political Theory
REL 385 Religion in Chinese Society
REL 393 Religion at the Limits
REL/JSP/PHI 435 Modern Jewish Thought
South Asian Studies
SAS/REL 123 Religious Auto/Biography
SAS/REL 283 India’s Religious Worlds
SAS/ANT/WGS 324 Modern South Asian Cultures
SAS/REL 367/MES 365 God and Beauty in Islamic Art
Spanish
SPA/LAS 465 Literature and Popular Culture
Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 101 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies
WGS/ENG 192 Gender and Literary Texts
WGS 201 Global Feminisms
WGS/PHI 297 Philosophy of Feminism
WGS/AAS 303 Black Women Writers
WGS/ANT/SAS 324 Modern South Asian Cultures
WGS/SWK 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts
WGS/ANT/GEO 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
Writing and Rhetoric
WRT 115 Writing, Rhetoric, and the Environment
WRT 116 Writing, Rhetoric, and Social Action
WRT 117 Writing, Rhetoric, and Satire
WRT 118 Writing for a Better You
WRT 240 Writing through Health, Wellness, and Illness
WRT 304 Indigenous Writing and Rhetoric

David B. Falk College Of Sport And Human Dynamics
SWK/WGS 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts
Only Available For Students in the Renée Crown Honors Program
HNR 240 Arts without Borders
HNR 260/GEO 219 American Diversity and Unity
HNR 260/WGS 200 History of the Women’s Suffrage Movement
HNR 340 Good Film, Bad People
HNR 340 Fiction Writing Workshop
HNR 340 Tell Your Story Walking
HNR 360/HST 347 Modern American Politics through Fiction

Transfer and other credit are not accepted for the Writing Intensive Requirement except when defined in articulation agreements.

These courses may not be used to satisfy the Writing Intensive Requirement if taken prior to Fall 1995.

Section B - The Language Skills Requirement #

Students satisfy the Language Skills option of the Liberal Skills Requirement by demonstrating that they have achieved a certain level of competence in a language other than English by either:

  1. completing a 4-credit language course numbered 201, or a 3- or 4-credit language course numbered 202 or higher (see Advanced Language Work under Exemptions and Alternatives); or
  2. satisfying one of the requirements listed on the next page under "Exemptions and Alternatives."

Beginners can complete the language requirement with a sequence of three 4-credit courses numbered 101, 102, and 201.

Courses numbered 101, 102, and 201 are available on a regular basis in Ancient Greek, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi/Urdu, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish.

STUDENTS MAY NOT RECEIVE CREDIT FOR A LOWER LEVEL LANGUAGE COURSE TAKEN AFTER EARNING A GRADE IN A HIGHER LEVEL COURSE IN THE SAME LANGUAGE.

Generic Course Descriptions #

Catalog descriptions may vary slightly from the following, depending on the language; see entries under specific languages. The frequency of offering also may vary for different languages.

XXX (e.g., SPA) 101 LANGUAGE I (e.g., SPANISH I) (4 credits) (only offered in the fall)

Introductory proficiency-based course that prepares students to understand, speak, read and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in the language (e.g., Spanish). Prerequisite. No prior experience, or admission by placement testing.

XXX 102 LANGUAGE II (4 Credits) (offered in the spring; some languages offered in the fall) Continuing proficiency-based course that develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in the languages. Prerequisite: Successful completion of XXX 101 or admission by placement testing.

XXX 201 LANGUAGE III (4 Credits) (offered in the spring; some languages offered in the fall) Refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in the language. Prerequisite: Successful completion of XXX 102 or admission by placement testing.

Exemptions and Alternatives #

The following options are also available to fulfill the requirement:

Advanced Placement. Students who score a four in the following examinations thereby demonstrate a competency equivalent to Syracuse University language courses numbered 201 and satisfy the Language Skills Requirement: Chinese Language and Culture, Japanese Language and Culture, Latin, Spanish Literature.

Demonstrated Competence. Students who can show proof of a native or near native competency in a language other than English may seek approval of a petition from the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics to have their LAC Language Skills requirement fulfilled by virtue of their proficiency.

Advanced Language Work. One may fulfill the requirement by completing with a grade of C or better any 3- or 4-credit course taught in a language other than English numbered 202 or above offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.

International Students. Students whose native language is not English may petition to have the language requirement fulfilled by their knowledge of their natural language.

Study Abroad. Programs of Syracuse University Abroad (SUA) in Chile, China, France, India, Italy, and Spain offer the same courses that are available on campus for satisfying the language requirement.

Transfer Credit. Transfer credit for foreign language courses will not be considered for approval until it has been evaluated by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at Syracuse University to determine the appropriate course equivalent. Credit will be considered for acceptance by the College if taken at an accredited institution.

Section C - The Quantitative Skills Requirement #

A student may satisfy the Quantitative Skills option of the Liberal Skills Requirement by successfully completing a First Course and a different Second Course drawn from the lists below. When planning a program, be aware that many courses in the second course list have prerequisite courses. Some courses appear on both lists.

Any student who completes a calculus course numbered 284 or higher with a grade of C or better is thereby exempt from the need to take an additional course to complete the Quantitative Skills Requirement. Calculus courses numbered 285 or higher may simultaneously be used to partially satisfy the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Divisional Requirement. MAT 284 cannot be used to meet both the Quantitative Skills Requirement and the Natural Science and Mathematics Divisional Requirements. It can only be used to meet one of these requirements.

Courses for Section C - The Quantitative Skills Requirement #

First Course:
MAT 121 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I
MAT 183 Elements of Modern Mathematics
MAT 193 Algebra-Infused Precalculus (to be followed by MAT 285 or MAT 295)
MAT 194 Precalculus (to be followed by MAT 285 or MAT 295)
MAT 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics I
MAT 285 Life Sciences Calculus I, or
MAT 295 Calculus I
Second Course: (Note: Some of these courses have prerequisites)
GEO 386 Quantitative Geographical Analysis
MAT 122 Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts II
MAT 222 Elementary Probability and Statistics II
MAT 284 Business Calculus
MAT 285 Life Sciences Calculus I, or
MAT 295 Calculus I
MAT 286 Life Sciences Calculus II, or
MAT 296 Calculus II
MAX 201 Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences
PSC 202 Introduction to Political Analysis
PSY 252 Statistical Methods II
SOC 318 Introduction to Research
*SWK 361 Foundations of Social Work Research *Apply as Non-Arts & Sciences credit

Many students will satisfy the Quantitative Skills Requirement by taking a pair of statistics courses. MAT 121 provides introductions to statistics with emphasis on the analysis of real data sets. It does not assume any prerequisite mathematical preparation, although it is desirable that students have a reasonable level of competence in high school algebra. Students who complete MAT 121 may consider completing the sequence with one of the following: GEO 386, MAX 201, PSC 202, PSY 252, SOC 318, or SWK 361. Consult your advisor.

Only students who have mastered high school algebra should contemplate any of the remaining options for satisfying the quantitative skills requirement.

For Students Not Majoring In Sciences

The sequence MAT 221-222, Elementary Probability and Statistics, is designed for non-science majors and introduces basic concepts of probability and statistics and their applications. It is more mathematically rigorous than MAT 121-122.

For Students Interested In Programs Outside Of Arts And Sciences

Students should consult with their academic advisor to determine which sequence will work best for them.

For Students With Strong Mathematics Backgrounds

Students with strong mathematics backgrounds should consider taking calculus. MAT 285 is designed for students planning to major in the social or life sciences, whereas MAT 295 is designed for engineering students and science and mathematics majors. Students with a weak background in trigonometry and analytic geometry should take one of the sequences MAT 194-285 or MAT 194-295.

Exemptions and Alternatives #

Advanced Placement. Any student who received 4-6 credits of calculus on the basis of the CEEB Advanced Placement examination satisfies the QUANTITATIVE SKILLS requirement.

Calculus. Any student who completes with a grade of C or better any one calculus course numbered 284 or above has satisfied the QUANTITATIVE SKILLS requirement.

Advanced Credit Exam. Any student receiving 3 or more credits in calculus by advanced credit exam satisfies the QUANTITATIVE SKILLS requirement.

Transfer Credit. Courses transferred to Syracuse need not be retaken for the purposes of the QUANTITATIVE SKILLS requirement. In very exceptional circumstances, e.g. courses completed at a non-accredited institution, students may petition to take a competency examination in any of the courses offered by the Mathematics Department. Students who pass such an examination are deemed to have passed the corresponding course for the purposes of the requirement. Petitions for such examinations should be submitted to the chair of the Mathematics Department.

Placement #

To determine the appropriate course for you:

  1. Take the Mathematics Placement Test as indicated in the first term enrollment selection information provided.
  2. Consult the descriptions of mathematics courses and discuss your objectives with your advisor.
  3. Follow the placement advice of the Mathematics Department on the basis of your placement test.

Transfer Students: If you are planning to take any mathematics course numbered 121 or above and have not been granted transfer credit for any such course, you should take the Mathematics Placement Test and consult with your advisor.

Part II - The Divisional Perspectives Requirement #

The requirement that students take four courses in each of the three curricular divisions of the College – the Humanities, Social Science and Natural Science and Mathematics divisions – is designed to promote goals fundamental to a liberal education.

  • To enable students to develop broad perspectives informed by the best of scholarship and research from across the fields of liberal inquiry.
  • To provide a critical understanding of various modes of intellectual inquiry and of how they differ, complement and compete with each other.
  • To enable students to explore the opportunities for upper division studies – including fields in which they might major or minor – so that their subsequent choices will be informed ones.

To satisfy the Divisional Perspectives Requirement:

  1. A student must take four, 3- or 4-credit courses in each of the three curricular divisions of the College of Arts and Sciences – that is, in the Humanities, the Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the Social Sciences divisions.
  2. In each division, two of the courses must constitute an approved sequence. Courses in a sequence may be taken in either order unless one is prerequisite to the other. *
  3. Of the twelve courses used to satisfy the Divisional Perspectives Requirement, no more than three courses may be taken from a single department or program (even if the courses of the department or program are in more than one division), with the exception of 3-credit HNR courses offered by the Renée Crown University Program. Any course cross listed is considered to belong to each of the departments in the cross listing. Therefore, it counts as one of the maximum of three allowed from a single department to fulfill the Divisional Perspectives Requirement. Experience Credit and Independent Study credit cannot be used to satisfy the Divisional Perspective Requirement.
  4. In each division, no more than one course may be selected from schools and colleges outside the College of Arts and Sciences.
  5. In the Natural Science and Mathematics Division, at least one laboratory course must be included.

* In the lists that follow, courses connected by a hyphen ("-") or otherwise stated constitute a sequence.

Section A - The Humanities Division #

4 courses needed.

The Humanities Division encompasses the history, theory, analysis and criticism of language, literature and other texts, religion, art, and music; and the examination of fundamental questions arising in the human search for values, knowledge, purpose, and meaning. These are central concerns of the departments or programs of African American Studies; English; Languages, Literatures and Linguistics; Art and Music Histories; Philosophy; Religion, Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition, and Women's and Gender Studies. Hence, most courses satisfying the Humanities Division requirements come from these departments and programs.

The Humanities List #

Students must take at least four courses from the following list, including a two-course sequence (indicated by hyphens), to complete the requirement for four courses in this division. No more than three courses may be taken from a single department or program (even if the courses of the department or program are in more than one division).

Courses for Section A - The Humanities Division #

African American Studies
AAS 138 Writing About Black Culture
AAS 206-207 Introduction to African American Music; Survey of African Music
AAS 231-232 African American Literature to 1900; African American Lit: 20th and 21st
AAS 233-234 The Caribbean Novel; African Fiction
AAS 235 African American Drama
AAS 241/REL 281- Religious Diversity in America
-AAS/REL 345 African American Religious History
AAS 302 Contemporary African American Theater
AAS/WGS 303 Black Women Writers
AAS 304 Workshop: African American Theater
AAS 305 African Orature
AAS 331 The African American Novel: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
AAS 338 Creative Writing Workshop
AAS/REL 345 African American Religious History
AAS 361/HOA 386 Art of the Black World
AAS/WGS 403 African and Caribbean Women Writers
AAS 408 Masters of American Black Music
AAS 409 African American Jazz and Social Life
AAS 433 Harlem Renaissance: Literature and Ideology
AAS 465 The Image of Blacks in Art and Film
AAS 470 Internship in African American Studies (when appropriate, by petition)
AAS 490 Independent Study (when appropriate, by petition)
AAS 540 Seminar in African American Studies (when appropriate, by petition)
Anthropology
ANT 185 Global Encounters: Comparing World Views and Values Cross Culturally
ANT/LIN 202 Languages of the World
ANT 273/REL/NAT 244 Indigenous Religions
ANT 326/WGS 327 Africa through the Novel
ANT 371/ LIN 371 Dimensions of Bilingualism and Multiculturalism
ANT/ LIN 375 Forensic Linguistics
ANT 376 Folklore
ANT 378/ LIN 373 Language, Variation, and Change
Art and Music Histories
*****All HOA courses A sequence in art history can be made up of one HOA 100-level course plus any other HOA course (at any level).
*****All HOM courses. A sequence in HOM can be made up of any two HOM courses.
Cognitive Science
COG courses may be accepted by petition.
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 316 Introduction to Applied Phonetics
English and Textual Studies
*****All ENG courses. A sequence can be made up of any two 100-level ENG courses, any two 200-level ENG courses, or a combination of one 100-level ENG course and one 200-level ENG course, or the combination of ENG 242 and ENG 305.
History
HST 111-112 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815; Modern Europe: Napoleon to the Present
HST 210-211 The Ancient World; Medieval & Renaissance Europe
HST 310 The Early Middle Ages
HST 311 Medieval Civilization
HST 312 Reformation of the 16th Century
HST/MES 319 The Middle East in the 20th Century
HST 320 Traditional China
HST 321 Modern China
HST 354 Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
HST 355 The Italian Renaissance
HST/WGS 379 Gender, Race, and Colonialism
HST/SPA/WGS 417 History of Women in Spain
Honors
Any 2-course combination of HNR 240, 340, or 440 including either taken twice constitute a sequence.
Humanities
All HUM courses
Jewish Studies Program
JSP courses that are cross-listed with humanities courses
Latino-Latin American Studies
LAS 302/SPA 322 Introduction to Latin American Literature
LAS/SPA 326 Beyond the Screen: Latin American and Spanish Film
LAS/LIT/WGS 343 Latina Feminist Theories
LAS/SPA 402 Hispanic Journalistic Practices
LAS/PHI 425 Post-colonialism and Philosophy
LAS/SPA 433 Business Spanish
LAS/SPA 461 Nobel Prize Writers of the Spanish-Speaking World
LAS/SPA 463 Contemporary Latin American Theater
LAS/SPA 465 Literature and Popular Culture
LAS/SPA 467 Film and Literature
LAS/SPA 471 Contemporary Latin American Literature
LAS/SPA/WGS 475 Women, Myth and Nation in Latin American Literature
LAS/SPA 479 Perspectives on Mexico and Central America: Literature, Art, Film
LAS/SPA 481 The Literature of Latinos in the United States
LAS/SPA 489 Hispanic Caribbean Narrative and Film
LAS/SPA 493 Afro-Hispanic Topics in Caribbean Literature
LAS/SPA 495 Marginal Culture in Hispanic Caribbean Literature
LAS/SPA 497 Text and Context in Cuban Revolutionary Literature
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
QSX 112 Sexualities, Genders, Bodies
OSX/REL 323 Christianity and Sexuality
QSX/REL 357 Queerly Religious
Linguistics
*****All LIN courses. The following are sequences:
LIN 201-LIN/ANT 202 The Nature and Study of Language; Languages of the World
LIN 201-LIN 251 The Nature and Study of Language; English Words
LIN 201- LIN 321 The Nature and Study of Language; Introduction to Methodology of Teaching Languages: English/Foreign Language Teaching
LIN 201-LIN/ANT 371 The Nature and Study of Language; Dimensions of Bilingualism and Multiculturalism
LIN 201-LIN 373/ANT 378 The Nature and Study of Language; Language Variation and Change
LIN 201-LIN/ANT 374/SOC 372 The Nature and Study of Language; Topics of Sociolinguistics
LIN 201-LIN 392 The Nature and Study of Language; Second Language Acquisition
Literature in Translation
*****All LIT courses. The following are sequences:
LIT 101-102 Introduction to Classical Literature
LIT 101-203 Introduction to Classical Literature; Greek & Roman Epic in English Translation
LIT 101-211 Introduction to Classical Literature; Greek & Roman Drama in English Translation
LIT 102-203 Introduction to Classical Literature; Greek & Roman Epic in English Translation
LIT 102-211 Introduction to Classical Literature; Greek & Roman Drama in English Translation
LIT 203-211 Greek & Roman Epic in English Translation; Greek & Roman Drama in English Translation
LIT 226-227 Dostoevsky and Tolstoy; Pasternak and Solzhenitsyn
LIT 226-RUS/LIT 331 Dostoevsky and Tolstoy; Russian Culture through Fiction and Film
LIT 227-RUS/LIT 331 Pasternak and Solzhenitsyn; Russian Culture through Fiction and Film
LIT 241-242 Dante and the Medieval World; Petrarch and the Renaissance World
LIT 241-245 Dante and the Medieval World; Florence and Renaissance Civilization
Middle Eastern Studies
MES/REL/SAS 165 Discovering Islam
MES/HST 319 The Middle East in the 20th Century
MES/JSP/LIT/REL 335 Israeli Literature and Culture
MES/LIT/ARB 336 Arabic Cultures
MES 365/SAS/REL 367 God and Beauty in Islamic Art
MES/SAS/REL/WGS 465 Beyond the Veil, Gender Politics in Islam
Native American and Indigenous Studies
NAT/REL 142 Native American Religion
NAT 208 Haudenosaunee Languages and Culture
NAT/REL 244/ANT 273 Indigenous Religions
NAT 346 /HOA 387 Native North American Art
NAT/REL 347 Religion and the Conquest of America
NAT/REL 348 Religion and American Consumerism
Philosophy
*****All PHI courses.
A sequence can be made up of any two 100-level PHI courses, any two 200-level PHI courses, or a combination of one 100-level PHI and one 200-level PHI course with the following exception: the combination of PHI 171 and PHI 172 does not constitute a sequence.
Religion
*****All REL courses. A sequence can be made up of any REL course and any REL course at the 200-level or above.
South Asian Studies
SAS/REL 123 Religious Auto/Biography
SAS/REL/MES 165 Discovering Islam
SAS/REL 185 Hinduism
SAS/REL 186 Buddhism
SAS/REL 283 India’s Religious Worlds
SAS/REL 367/MES 365 God and Beauty in Islamic Art
SAS/REL/WGS 384 Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism
SAS/WGS/REL/MES 465 Beyond the Veil: Gender Politics in Islam
Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 101-WGS/PHI 297 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies; Philosophy of Feminism
WGS 101-301 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies; Feminist Theories
WGS 101- Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies;
-WGS/LAS/LIT 343 Latina Feminist Theories
All WGS courses cross-listed with ENG, HOA, HOM, LIT, PHI, & REL in addition to the following:
WGS 301 Feminist Theories
WGS/AAS 303 Black Women Writers
WGS 310 Feminist Inquiries (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS 327/ANT 326 Africa through the Novel
WGS/LAS/LIT 343 Latina Feminist Theories
WGS 365 Negotiating Difference: Coming of Age Narratives
WGS/HST 379 Gender, Race and Colonialism
WGS/SAS/REL 384 Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism
WGS 400 Selected Topics (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS/AAS 403 African and Caribbean Women Writers
WGS 410 Advanced Studies in Feminist Thought (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS/SPA/HST 417 History of Women in Spain
WGS/SAS/REL/MES 465 Beyond the Veil: Gender Politics in Islam
WGS/LAS/SPA 475 Women, Myth and Nation in Latin American Literature
WGS 490 Independent Study (when appropriate, by petition)
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition Rhetoric
WRT 114 Writing Culture
WRT 115 Writing, Rhetoric, and the Environment
WRT 116 Writing, Rhetoric, and the Social Action
WRT 117 Writing, Rhetoric, and Satire
WRT 118 Writing for a Better You
WRT 240 Writing through Health, Wellness, and Illness
WRT 255 Advanced Argumentative Writing
WRT 304 Indigenous Writing and Rhetoric
WRT 413 Rhetoric and Ethics
WRT 422 Studies in Creative Nonfiction
WRT 423 African American Rhetoric
WRT 424 Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, Identity
WRT 428 Studies in Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy
Interdepartmental Sequences In The Humanities
LIN 201-PHI 251 The Nature and Study of Languages; Logic
ANT 185- WGS 101 Global Encounters: Comparing World Views and Values Cross-Culturally; Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 101- Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies;
-LAS/LIT/WGS 343 Latina Feminist Theories

Arabic
All ARB courses 202 and above
Chinese
All CHI courses 202 and above
French and Francophone Studies
All FRE courses 202 and above. The following are sequences:
FRE 305-306 Evolution and Revolution through the Centuries; From Romanticism to Postmodernism
FRE 315-316 French Civilization; Contemporary French Culture
German
All GER courses 202 and above
Greek **
All GRE courses 202 and above
Hebrew
All HEB courses 202 and above
Hindi / Urdu
All HIN courses 202 and above
Italian
All ITA courses 202 and above. The following are sequences:
ITA 202-325 Italian IV; Advanced Language Use
ITA 202-326 Italian IV; Italy Today: Language, Media and Culture in Contemporary Italy
Japanese
All JPS courses 202 and above
Korean
All KOR courses 202 and above
All LAT courses 202 and above
Portuguese
All POR courses 202 and above
Russian
All RUS courses 202 and above The following are sequences:
RUS/LIT 331-LIT 226 Russian Culture through Fiction and Film; Dostoevsky and Tolstoy
RUS/LIT 331-LIT 227 Russian Culture through Fiction and Film; Pasternak and Solzhenitsyn
Spanish
All SPA courses 202 and above
SPA 301-321 Approaches to Reading Texts; Introduction to Spanish Literature
SPA 301- Approaches to Reading Texts;
-SPA 322/LAS 302 Introduction to Latin American Literature
SPA 321- Introduction to Spanish Literature;
-SPA 322/LAS 302 Introduction to Latin American Literature
Turkish
All TRK courses 202 and above

**Any two GRE or LAT courses at or above the 300-level (LAT 310, 320, 410, 420; GRE 310, 320, 410, 420) constitute a sequence.

Section B - The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division #

4 courses needed

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division encompasses the investigation of natural phenomena, including the development of predictive explanatory systems, and includes the study of numerical and other abstract structures and relations. These are central concerns of the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Physics, and Mathematics. Hence, most courses satisfying the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division requirements come from these departments.

The Natural Sciences and Mathematics List #

Students must take at least four courses from this list, including a 2-course sequence (indicated by hyphens) and a course with a laboratory (indicated by course numbers in bold print) to complete the requirement for four courses in this division. No more than three courses may be taken from a single department or program (even if the courses of the department or program are in more than one division).

Courses for Section B - The Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division #

Anthropology
ANT 131-ANT 433 Introduction to Biological Anthropology; Human Osteology
Astronomy
AST 101 Our Corner of the Universe
AST 104 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
*****All AST courses. A sequence can be made up of any two 100-level PHY or AST courses, any two 200-level PHY or AST courses, or a combination of one 100-level PHY or AST and one 200-level PHY or AST course.
Biology
BIO 121-123 (124) General Biology I & II
*****All BIO courses.
Chemistry
CHE 103-113 Chemistry in the Modern World; Forensic Science
CHE 106 (107)-116 (117) General Chemistry Lecture I (General Chemistry Laboratory I); General Chemistry Lecture II (General Chemistry Laboratory II)
CHE 109 (129)-119 (139) General Chemistry Lecture I -Honors and Majors (General Chemistry Laboratory I -Honors and Majors); General Chemistry Lecture II -Honors and Majors (General Chemistry Laboratory II – Honors and Majors)
*****All CHE courses. Credit is given for CHE 106-116 or CHE 109-119, but not for both. NOTE: this is the same for the lab 107-117 or 129-139.
Cognitive Science
COG courses may be accepted by petition.
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 212-315 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders; Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
CSD 212-325 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders; Fundamentals of Hearing Science
CSD 212-345 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders; Speech Science
CSD/NEU 409 Cognitive Neuroscience of Speech and Language
Earth and Environmental Sciences
Any EAR course will count toward the divisional requirement of four courses in the natural sciences and mathematics.
First Course in the Sequence:
EAR 105 - Earth Science or
EAR 110 - Dynamic Earth or
EAR 203 - Earth System Science
Second Course in the Sequence: EAR 106 - Geohazards & Natural Disasters
EAR 111 - Climate Change Past and Present
EAR 117 - Oceanography
EAR 200 - Selected topics
EAR 205 - Water and Our Environment
EAR 210 - History of Earth and Life
EAR 225 - Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Prospective Earth Science majors are strongly encouraged to take the EAR 110-210 sequence. Credit is given for EAR 110 or EAR 105 but not for both.
Geography and the Environment
GEO 155-215 The Natural Environment; Global Environmental Change
GEO 155-316 The Natural Environment; River Environments
GEO 155-326 The Natural Environment; The Geography of Climate and Weather
GEO 455 Biogeography
GEO 482 Environmental Remote Sensing
GEO 583 Environmental Geographical Information Systems
Honors
HNR 250, 350, 450 Honors Natural Sciences & Mathematics Courses
HNR 255, 355, 455 Topics in Science with Laboratory Component
Any 2-course combination of HNR 250 or 255, 350 or 355, or 450-455, including either taken twice.
Mathematics
MAT 285-286 Life Sciences Calculus I, II
MAT 295-296 Calculus I, II
All MAT courses above 230. (MAT 284 cannot be used simultaneously to meet the divisional perspective requirement and to meet the Quantitative Skills Requirement.)
Physics
Four physics courses have no pre-requisites and are recommended as introductory courses. PHY 101 is algebra-based. PHY 211, PHY 312 (“Relativity and Cosmology: Einstein and Beyond”), and PHY 314 (“Quantum Computing Demystified”) have a calculus co-requisite (MAT 285 or MAT 295).
PHY 101 Major Concepts of Physics I
PHY 102 Major Concepts of Physics II
PHY 211 or PHY 215 (221) General Physics I
PHY 212 or PHY 216 (222) General Physics II
*****All PHY courses. A sequence can be made up of any two 100-level PHY or AST courses, any two 200-level PHY courses, or a combination of one 100-level PHY or AST and one 200-level PHY course.
Psychology
PSY/NEU 223 Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
PSY 323 Brain and Behavior
PSY 324 Developmental Biopsychology
PSY 334 Laboratory in Developmental Biopsychology
Science Teaching
*****All SCI courses.
Science, Technology, and Society
STS course may be accepted by petition.
Other Schools and Colleges *Apply as Non-Arts & Sciences credit
David B. Falk College of Sports and Human Dynamics
*NSD 225 Nutrition in Health

Section C - The Social Sciences Division #

--- 4 courses needed ---

The Social Sciences Division encompasses the history, theory, and investigation of societies, systems, regions, groups and individuals. These are central concerns of the departments of African American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, Geography and the Environment, History, Political Science, Policy Studies Psychology, Sociology, International Relations and Women's and Gender Studies. Hence, most courses satisfying the Social Sciences Division requirements come from these departments.

The Social Sciences List #

Students must take at least four courses from the following list, including a 2-course sequence (indicated by hyphens) to complete the requirement for four courses in this division. No more than three courses may be taken from a single department or program (even if the courses of the department or program are in more than one division).

Courses for Section C - The Social Sciences Division #

African American Studies
AAS/ANT 112-AAS 202 Introduction to African American Studies; Caribbean Society since Independence
AAS/ANT 112- Introduction to African American Studies;
-AAS/SOC 254 Comparative Study of American Ethnic Communities
AAS/PSC 306- African American Politics; Politics of Africa
-AAS/PSC 341
AAS 312 Pan Africanism
AAS/HST 332 African American History: Through the 19th Century
AAS/HST 333 African American History: After the 19th Century
AAS/PSC 341 Politics of Africa
AAS/SOC 353 Sociology of the African American Experience
AAS/PSC 364 African International Relations
AAS/PSC 365 International Political Economy of the Third World
AAS/HST 402 Slavery and Abolition
AAS/SOC 410 Seminar on Social Change
AAS 470 Internship in African American Studies (when appropriate, by petition)
AAS 490 Independent Study (when appropriate, by petition)
AAS 501 African American Sociological Practice, 1900-1945
AAS/WGS 512 African American Women’s History
AAS 525 Research Methods in African American Studies
AAS 540 Seminar in African American Studies (when appropriate, by petition)
Anthropology
ANT 111 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, together with any ANT 200-level or above course, constitutes a sequence except, 202, 273, 326, 376, and 433.
ANT 121 Peoples and Cultures of the World, together with any ANT 200-level or above course, constitutes a sequence except, 202, 273, 326, 376, and 433.
ANT 141-ANT/HST 145 Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory; Archaeology of and in the Modern World
Any ANT course except 131, 185, 202, 273, 326, 376, 433, 472.
Cognitive Science
COG courses may be accepted by petition.
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CSD 303 Communication in the Classroom
CSD 422 Development of Speech and Language
CSD 427 Speech and Language Disorders in Children
Economics
*****All ECN courses.
ECN 101-102 Introductory Microeconomics; Introductory Macroeconomics
ECN 101-203 Introductory Microeconomics; Economic Ideas and Issues
ECN 101-304 Introductory Microeconomics; The Economics of Social Issues
ECN 101-310 Introductory Microeconomics; Special Topics in Economics
ECN 101-365 Introductory Microeconomics; The World Economy
ECN 101-367 Introductory Microeconomics; Economics of Globalization
ECN 203-301 Economic Ideas and Issues; Intermediate Microeconomics
ECN 203-302 Economic Ideas and Issues; Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECN 203-304 Economic Ideas and Issues; The Economics of Social Issues
ECN 203-310 Economic Ideas and Issues; Special Topics in Economics
ECN 203-311 Economic Ideas and Issues; Intermediate Mathematical Microeconomics
ECN 203-365 Economic Ideas and Issues; The World Economy
ECN 203-367 Economic Ideas and Issues; Economics of Globalization
Geography and the Environment
GEO 103-203 Environment and Society; Society and the Politics of Nature
GEO 103-317 Environment and Society; Geography of Mountain Environments
GEO 103-340 Environment and Society; Geography of Oil
GEO 103-353 Environment and Society; Geographies of Environmental Justice
GEO 103-354/HST 384 Environment and Society; American Environmental History and Geography
GEO 103-356 Environment and Society; Environmental Ideas and Policy
GEO 103-374 Environment and Society; Environment and Development in the Global South
GEO 105-272 World Urban Geography; World Cultures
GEO 105-273 World Urban Geography; Geography of Capitalism: The Political Economy of
GEO 105-313 World Urban Geography; The United States
GEO 105-321/ LAS 321 World Urban Geography; Latin American Development: Spatial Aspects
GEO 105-325 World Urban Geography; Colonialism in Latin America
GEO 105-331 World Urban Geography; European Union
GEO 105-362 World Urban Geography; The European City
GEO 171-272 Human Geographies; World Cultures
GEO 171-273 Human Geographies; Geography of Capitalism: The Political Economy of
GEO 171-313 Human Geographies; The United States
GEO 171-340 Human Geographies; Geography of Oil
GEO 171-362 Human Geographies; The European City
GEO 171-367/ANT/WGS 367 Human Geographies; Gender in the Globalizing World
GEO 171-372 Human Geographies; Political Geography
GEO 272-273 World Cultures; Geography of Capitalism: The Political Economy of
GEO 273-372 World Political Economy; Political Geography
All GEO courses except GEO 155, 215, 316, 326, 327, 455, 482, & 583.
History
HST 101-102 American History to 1865; American History Since 1865
HST 121-122 Global History to 1750; Global History 1750 to Present
HST/MES 208-HST/MES 209 Middle East Since the Rise of Islam; Modern Middle East
All HST courses except HST 111, 112, 210, 211, 310, 311, 312, 319, 320, 321, 354, 355, 357, 358, 379, 417. HST 200, when awarded for IB or AP credit, counts as a sequence.
Honors
Any 2-course combination of HNR 260, 360, or 460 including either taken twice constitute a sequence.
International Relations
*****All IRP courses
Jewish Studies Program
JSP/MES/PSC/REL 342 Religion and Politics in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
JSP/HST 362 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Latino-Latin American Studies
LAS 313/HST 323 Modern Latin America
LAS 318/ANT 322 South American Cultures
LAS/GEO 321 Latin American Development: Spatial Aspects
LAS/HST 322 Colonial Latin America
LAS/HST 324 Recent Latin American History
LAS/PSC 333 Politics of Latin America
LAS 335/PSC 334 Mexico and the United States
LAS/PSC 358 Latin American International Relations
Law in the Liberal Arts
LLA 201 Elements of Law
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
QSX 111 Queer Histories, Communities, and Politics
QSX/HST 348 Queering the Middle Ages?
QSX/WGS 438 Trans Genders and Sexualities
Maxwell
MAX 123-132 Critical Issues for the United States; Global Community (These courses constitute a sequence and may be taken in any order).
All MAX courses except MAX 201, MAX 301, MAX 302, MAX 310, MAX 410
Middle Eastern Studies
MES/HST 208 - Middle East Since the Rise of Islam; Politics of the Middle East
-MES/PSC 344
MES/JSP/PSC/REL 342 Religion and Politics in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
MES/PSC 349 Politics of Iran
MES/HST/PSC 368 Islam and the West (taught in London only)
MES/ANT/PHP 382 Health in the Middle East
MES/PSC 391 Revolutions in the Middle East
MES/PSC 392 Islamism and Islamist Movements Today
MES/PSC 393 Middle Eastern Political Systems
MES/PSC 394 History of Islamic Political Thought
MES/PSC 395 Democratization in the Muslim World
MES/ANT 468 Middle East in Anthropological Perspective
Native American and Indigenous Studies
NAT 105 Introduction to Native American Studies
NAT/ANT 323 Peoples and Cultures of North America
NAT/SOC 441 Federal Indian Policy and Native American Identity
NAT/SOC 444 Contemporary Native American Movements
NAT/ANT 445 Public Policy and Archaeology
NAT/ANT 447 Archaeology of North America
NAT/ANT 456 Representations of Indigenous Peoples in Popular Culture
NAT/ANT 459 Contemporary Native North American Issues
NAT/ANT 461 Museums and Native Americans
Political Science
*****All PSC courses.
PSC/AAS 306- African American Politics; Politics of Africa
-PSC/AAS 341
PSC 308-309 Politics of U.S. Public Policy; Interest Group Politics
PSC 324-325 Constitutional Law I; Constitutional Law II
PSC 352-353 International Law; International Organization
PSC 121 (129) American National Government and Politics (or Honors), together with any of the following courses, constitutes a sequence:
PSC 302 Environmental Politics and Policy
PSC 303 The Development of the American State
PSC 304 The Judicial Process
PSC 305 U.S. Congressional Politics
PSC/AAS 306 African American Politics
PSC 308 The Politics of U.S. Public Policy
PSC 309 Interest Group Politics
PSC 311 American Political Parties
PSC 313 Campaign Analysis
PSC 314 Public Opinion and Electoral Behavior
PSC 315 Politics and Media
PSC 316 The Supreme Court in American Politics
PSC 323 Politics of the Executive Branch
PSC 324 Constitutional Law I
PSC 329/HST 341 The Modern American Presidency
PSC 374 Law and Society
PSC 469 Global Migration
PSC 123 Comparative Government and Politics, together with any of the following courses, constitutes a sequence:
PSC 231 Canadian Politics
PSC/LAS 333 Politics of Latin America
PSC 334/LAS 335 Mexico and the United States
PSC 335 Politics of East Asia
PSC/AAS 341 Politics of Africa
PSC 343 Politics of Europe
PSC/MES 344 Politics of the Middle East
PSC 346 Comparative Third World Politics
PSC 347 Politics of Russia
PSC 348 Politics and the Military
PSC/MES 349 Politics of Iran
PSC 356 Political Conflict
PSC 387 Ethnic Conflict
PSC 388 Politics of Globalization
PSC/MES 391 Revolutions in the Middle East
PSC/MES 392 Islamism and Islamist Movements Today
PSC/MES 393 Middle Eastern Political Systems
PSC/MES 394 History of Islamic Political Thought
PSC/MES 395 Democratization in the Muslim World
PSC 469 Global Migration
PSC 124 (139) International Relations (or Honors), together with any of the following courses, constitutes a sequence:
PSC/MES/REL/JSP 342 Religion and Politics in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
PSC 348 Politics and the Military
PSC 350 Problems in International Relations
PSC 352 International Law
PSC 353 International Organization
PSC 354 Human Rights and Global Affairs
PSC 355 International Political Economy
PSC 356 Political Conflict
PSC 357 U.S. Foreign Policy
PSC/PHI 363 Ethics and International Relations
PSC/AAS 364 African International Relations
PSC/AAS 365 International Political Economy of the Third World
PSC 388 Politics of Globalization
PSC/GEO 396 European Integration
PSC 397 Realism and Power Politics in I.R.
PSC 398 How the United States Became a Great Power
PSC 469 Global Migration
PSC/PHI 125 Political Theory, together with any of the following courses, constitutes a sequence:
PSC 307 The Politics of Citizenship
PSC 371 Democratic Theory and Politics
PSC 373/PHI 317 Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition and its Critics
PSC 375/PHI 397 Philosophy of Law
PSC 378 Power & Identity
PSC 382/PHI 417 Contemporary Political Philosophy
Psychology
All PSY courses except PSY 223, PSY 252, PSY 323, PSY 324, PSY 334 PSY 205 (or 209), Foundations of Human Behavior (or Honors) and either PSY 274, PSY 335, PSY 336 or PSY 337 constitute a sequence.
Public Administration
PAI 305 Policy Implementation
PAI 310 Education Policy
PAI 415 Poverty Policy
Public affairs
PST 101 An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy
PST 351 Global Social Problems
Sociology
SOC 101-102 Introduction to Sociology; Social Problems
SOC 101-SOC/WGS 248 Introduction to Sociology; Racial and Ethnic Inequalities
SOC 101-SOC/WGS 281 Introduction to Sociology; Sociology of Families
*All SOC courses.
Social Science
*****All SOS courses.
South Asian Studies
SAS/ANT/WGS 324 Modern South Asian Cultures
SAS/HST 328 Ancient and Medieval India
SAS/HST 329 Making of Modern India
SAS/HST 375 British Empire
Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 201-WGS/SOC 425 Global Feminisms; Feminist Organizations
WGS 201-WGS/QSX 438 Global Feminisms; Trans Genders and Sexualities
WGS 201-439 Global Feminisms; Women, Gender and Violence in a Transnational Context
WGS 201-452 Global Feminisms; Feminism and Postcolonial Studies
WGS 201-453 Global Feminisms; Feminisms, Sexualities, and Human Rights in Middle Eastern Societies
All WGS courses crosslisted with ANT, ECN, GEO, HST, PSC, PSY, & SOC in addition to the following:
WGS 201 Global Feminisms
WGS 310 Feminist Inquiries (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS/SWK 326- Persons in Social Context;
-WGS/SWK 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts
WGS/CFE 362/SOC 361 Youth, School and Popular Culture
WGS 400 Selected Topics (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS 410 Advanced Studies in Feminist Thought (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS 414 Communication & Gender
WGS/QSX 438 Trans Genders and Sexualities
WGS 439 Women, Gender and Violence in a Transnational Context
WGS/CFE 444 Schooling & Diversity
WGS 452 Feminism and Postcolonial Studies
WGS 453 Feminisms, Sexualities, and Human Rights in Middle Eastern Societies
WGS 490 Independent Study (when appropriate, by petition)
WGS/AAS 512 African American Woman’s History

School of Education
*EDU/DSP 203 Introduction to Inclusive Schooling
*EXE 435 Introduction to Sports Psychology
*SPE 311 Perspectives on Disabilities
Martin J. Whitman School of Management
*LPP 255 Introduction to the Legal System
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
*SWK 314-315 Social Welfare Policy and Services I, II
SWK/WGS 326- Persons in Social Contexts;
-WGS/SWK 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts

Interdepartmental Sequences in the Social Sciences
AAS/ANT 112- Introduction to African American Studies;
-AAS 202 Caribbean Society Since independence
AAS/ANT 112- Introduction to African American Studies;
-AAS/SOC 254 Comparative Study of American Ethnic Communities
ANT 111-MAX 123 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology; Critical Issues for US
ANT 111-MAX 132 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology; Global Community
ANT 111-WGS 201 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology; Global Feminisms
ANT 121-GEO 272 Peoples and Cultures of the World; World Cultures
ANT 121-MAX 123 Peoples and Cultures of the World; Critical Issues for US
ANT 121-MAX 132 Peoples and Cultures of the World; Global Community
ANT 121-WGS 201 Peoples and Cultures of the World; Global Feminisms
ANT 141- Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory;
-ANT/HST 145 Archaeology of and in the Modern World
ECN 101-MAX 123 Introductory Microeconomics; Critical Issues for the United States
ECN 203-MAX 123 Economic Ideas & Issues; Critical Issues for the US
ECN 203-MAX 132 Economic Ideas & Issues; Global Community
GEO 171-MAX 132 Human Geographies; Global Community
GEO 272-MAX 132 World Cultures; Global Community
GEO 273-MAX 132 Geography of the World Economy: Capitalism, Inequality, Politics; Global
HST 101-MAX 123 American History to 1865; Critical Issues for the United States
HST 102-MAX 123 American History since 1865; Critical Issues for the United States
HST/MES 208- Middle East Since the Rise of Islam
-MES/PSC 344 Politics of the Middle East
PST 101- Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy;
-ECN/WGS 258 Poverty & Discrimination in America
PST 101-GEO 203 An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy; Environmental Problems and Policy
PST 101-MAX 123 Introduction to Analysis of Public Policy; Critical Issue for U.S.
PST 101- An Intro to the Analysis of Public Policy;
-PSC 121(129) American National Government and Politics (or Honors)
PST 101-ECN 203 An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy; Economic Ideas and Issues
PST 101-HST 102 An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy; American History Since 1865
PSC 121(129)- American National Government & Politics (or Honors);
-HST 101 American History to 1865
PSC 121(129)- American National Government & Politics (or Honors);
-HST 102 American History Since 1865
PSC 121(129)- American National Government & Politics (or Honors);
-MAX 123 Critical Issues for the U.S.
PSC 123-ANT 121 Comparative Government and Politics; Peoples and Cultures of the World
PSC 123-GEO 105 Comparative Government and Politics; World Urban Geography
PSC 123-GEO 272 Comparative Government and Politics; World Cultures
PSC 123-HST 316 Comparative Government and Politics; Europe Since 1945
PSC 123-MAX 132 Comparative Government and Politics; Global Community
PSC 124(139)-ANT 121 International Relations (or Honors); Peoples and Cultures of the World
PSC 124(139)-GEO 272 International Relations (or Honors); World Cultures
PSC 124(139)-GEO 273 International Relations (or Honors); Geography of the World Economy: Capitalism, Inequality, Politics
PSC 124(139)-MAX 132 International Relations (or Honors); Global Community
PSC 124(139)-WGS 201 International Relations (or Honors); Global Feminisms
PSC/PHI 125-ECN 203 Political Theory; Economic Ideas & Issues
PSC 129-GEO 219 American National Government & Politics (Honors); American Diversity & Unity (Honors)
PSC/MES 344- Politics of the Middle East; Middle East Since the Rise of Islam
-HST/MES 208
SOC 101-AAS/ANT 112 Intro to Sociology; Introduction to African American Studies
SOC 101-SOC/AAS 254 Introduction to Sociology; Comparative Study of American Ethnic Communities
SOC 101-MAX 123 Introduction to Sociology; Critical Issues for the United States
SOC 101-MAX 132 Introduction to Sociology; Global Community

Part III - The Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social issues Requirement #

Students are required to take three courses from the approved list that follows. These courses are designed to encourage students to think critically about social and ethical issues that are relevant to contemporary life. They are from a variety of departments and programs and will demonstrate the relevance of study in the liberal arts to gaining critical perspectives on aspects of contemporary society. Many of these courses may simultaneously be used to partially satisfy other Liberal Arts Core requirements.

Many of the courses that satisfy the Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social Issues Requirement promote the University’s core value of diversity. They help students to reflect on the diversity of peoples, social groups and cultures that surround them in contemporary life. Many other courses in the Liberal Arts Curriculum outside those on the list of Critical Reflections courses also serve this goal.

Transfer and other credit are not accepted for the Critical Reflections Requirement except when they are included in an Associate Degree as defined in articulation agreements.

Courses that fulfill the Critical Reflections requirement must be successfully completed by the student in the academic year in which they are listed in the Liberal Arts Core Guidebook.

Courses for the Critical Reflections Requirement #

African American Studies
AAS/ANT 112 Introduction to African American Studies
AAS 202 Caribbean Society since Independence
AAS 231 African American Literature to 1900: An Introduction
AAS 232 African American Literature: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
AAS 233 The Caribbean Novel
AAS 234 African Fiction
AAS 235 African American Drama
AAS/SOC 254 Comparative Study of American Ethnic Communities
AAS/WGS 303 Black Women Writers
AAS 305 African Orature
AAS/PSC 306 African American Politics
AAS 312 Pan Africanism
AAS 331 The African American Novel: Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
AAS/HST 333 African American History: After the 19th Century
AAS 338 Creative Writing Workshop
AAS/PSC 341 Politics of Africa
AAS/SOC 353 Sociology of the African American Experience
AAS/WGS 403 African and Caribbean Women Writers
AAS/SOC 410 Seminar on Social Change
AAS 433 Harlem Renaissance: Literature & Ideology
AAS 501 African American Sociological Practice, 1900-1945
AAS/WGS 512 African American Woman’s History
Anthropology
ANT/AAS 112 Introduction to African American Studies
ANT 185 Global Encounters: Comparing World Views and Values Cross Culturally
ANT/REL 221 Morality and Community
ANT 325 Anthropology of American Life in Film
ANT 326/WGS 327 Africa through the Novel
ANT/GEO/WGS 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
ANT/SAS 426 Cultures and Politics of Afghanistan and Pakistan
ANT 431 Human Variation
ANT/WGS 455 Culture and AIDS
ANT 467 Culture and Mental Disorders
ANT 469 Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective
ANT 477 Culture and Conflict
Art and Music Histories
HOA 176 The Visual Arts of the Americas
HOA 360 Art and Identity
HOM 372 Music in Multicultural America
HOA 377 Nineteenth Century American Art
HOA 378 Twentieth-Century American Art
HOM 419 Music and Media
HOM 453 Dance in American Culture
HOM/WGS 473 Women, Rap and Hip-Hop Feminism
HOM 482 Roots of Global Pop
HOM 485 Contemporary Indigenous Soundscapes
HOM/WGS 494 Music and Gender
Biology
BIO/PHI 396/REL 359 Stem Cells and Society
Earth and Environmental Sciences
EAR 106 Geohazards and Natural Disasters
EAR 111 Climate Change Past and Present
EAR 205 Water and our Environment
EAR 414 The Holocene: Climate and Environmental Change
Economics
ECN 304 Economics of Social Issues
English and Textual Studies
ENG 145 Reading Popular Culture
ENG 171 World Cinema, Beginnings to Present
ENG 172 The Literature of War and Peace
ENG 181 Class and Literary Texts
ENG 182 Race and Literary Texts
ENG 184 Ethnicity and Literary Texts
ENG/WGS 192 Gender and Literary Texts
ENG 193 Introduction to Asian American Literature
ENG 194 Introduction to Latino Literature
ENG 195 Arab American Literature and Culture
French and Francophone Studies
FRE 407 French Libertine Fictions
FRE 409 French Culture and Revolution
FRE 412 French Women Writers
FRE 417 “Impressions d’Afrique”: Caribbean Gazes
Geography
GEO 171 Human Geographies
GEO 272 World Cultures
GEO 273 Geography of Capitalism: The Political Economy of Global Inequality
GEO 314 Hazardous Geographic Environments
GEO 353 Geographies of Environmental Justices
GEO 363 Cities of North America
GEO/ANT/WGS 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
GEO 372 Political Geography
GEO 374 Environment and Development in the Global South
GEO 422 Water: Environment, Society, and Politics
GEO 440 Race and Space
GEO 563 The Urban Condition
History
HST 121 Global History to 1750
HST 122 Global History from 1750
HST 208 The Middle East since the Rise of Islam
HST 222 History of American Sexuality
HST 317 The Arab Revolutions
HST/SAS 328 Ancient and Medieval India
HST/AAS 333 African American History: After the 19th Century
HST 341/PSC 329 The Modern American Presidency
HST 342/PSC 327 Modern American Political Thought
HST 347 Modern American Politics through Fiction
HST/QSX 348 Queering the Middle Ages?
HST/WGS 349 Women in America: Civil War to Present
HST/JSP 362 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
HST/SAS 372 Caste and Inequality in Modern India
HST 373 The Crusades
HST/WGS 379 Gender, Race and Colonialism
HST 383/PSC 326 Foundations of American Political Thought
HST/QSX/WGS 389 LGBT History
HST 407 Iraq: Modern Nation to US Occupation
Humanities
HUM 145
Italian
ITA 434 Africa in Italian Literature
Jewish Studies Program
JSP/REL 337 Shoah: Responding to the Holocaust
JSP/HST 362 Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Latino-Latin America Studies Program
LAS 335/PSC 334 Mexico and the United States
LAS/LIT/WGS 343 Latina Feminist Theories
LAS/SPA 463 Contemporary Latin American Theater
LAS/SPA/WGS 475 Women, Myth and Nation in Latin American Literature
LAS/SPA 481 The Literature of Latinos in the United States
Law in the Liberal Arts
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
QSX 111 Queer Histories, Communities and Politics
QSX 112 Sexualities, Genders, Bodies
QSX/REL 323 Christianity and Sexuality
QSX/HST 348 Queering the Middle Ages?
QSX/REL 357 Queerly Religious
QSX/PSC 384 Sexuality and the Law
QSX/HST/WGS 389 LGBT History
QSX/SOC/WGS 456 LGBT Studies in Sociology
Linguistics
LIN 201 The Nature and Study of Language
Literature in Translation
LIT 256 Blood: A Cultural History
LIT/RUS 331 Russian Culture through Fiction and Film
LIT/LAS/WGS 343 Latina Feminist Theories
Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
MAX 123 Critical Issues for the United States
MAX 132 Global Community
Middle Eastern Studies
MES/HST 319 The Middle East in the 20th Century
Native American and Indigenous Studies
NAT/REL 142 Native American Religion
NAT/REL 347 Religion and the Conquest of America
NAT/REL 348 Religion and American Consumerism
Philosophy
PHI 171 Critical Thinking
PHI 172 Making Decisions
PHI 191 The Meaning of Life
PHI 192 Introduction to Moral Theory
PHI 209 Introduction to Moral Philosophy (Honors)
PHI 241/REL 292 The Human and Divine in Christian and Muslim Philosophy
PHI 245 Philosophy of Sport
PHI/WGS 297 Philosophy of Feminism
PHI 342/REL 394 Sources of the Self: Finding the “I” in Religion & Philosophy
PHI 343 Philosophy of Education
PHI/PSC 363 Ethics and International Relations
PHI 394 Environmental Ethics
PHI/BIO 396/REL 359 Stem Cells and Society
PHI/PSC 406 Citizenship from Modernity to Globalization (Offered only in Florence)
PHI 411 Philosophies of Race and Identity
PHI/PSC/WGS 413 Identity and Difference (Offered only in Florence)
PHI 493 Contemporary Ethical Issues
PHI 593/REL 551 Ethics and Health Professions
Political Science
PSC/AAS 306 African American Politics
PSC 310 Refugees in International Politics
PSC 314 Public Opinion and Electoral Behavior
PSC/WGS 319 Gender and Politics
PSC 324 Constitutional Law I
PSC 325 Constitutional Law II
PSC 326/HST 383 Foundations of American Political Thought
PSC 327/HST 342 Modern American Political Thought
PSC 329/HST 341 The Modern American Presidency
PSC 334/LAS 335 Mexico and the United States
PSC 339 Transitions to Democracy
PSC/AAS 341 Politics of Africa
PSC 345 Capitalism, For and Against
PSC 352 International Law
PSC 354 Human Rights & Global Affairs
PSC/PHI 363 Ethics and International Relations
PSC 371 Democratic Theory and Politics
PSC 374 Law and Society
PSC/QSX 384 Sexuality and the Law
PSC 386/WGS/SOC 354 Gender, Militarism, and War
PSC 387 Ethnic Conflict
PSC/PHI 406 Citizenship from Modernity to Globalization (Offered only in Florence)
PSC/PHI/WGS 413 Identity and Difference (Offered only in Florence)
Psychology
PSY/WGS 329 Biopsychological Perspectives on Women’s Health
PSY 376 Why Good People Do Terrible Things
PSY 379 The Social Psychology of Stigma
PSY 447 Autism
Public Affairs
PST 101 An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy
Religion
REL 106 What is Belief?
REL 108 Religion and Its Critics
REL 125 Religion and Sexuality
REL/NAT 142 Native American Religion
REL/ANT 221 Morality and Community
REL 252 Ethical Decision Making
REL 255 Psychology, Spirituality, Love and Ethics
REL 257 Jesus in the Bible, Theology and Art
REL/SAS 283 India’s Religious Worlds
REL 292/PHI 241 The Human and Divine in Christian and Muslim Philosophy
REL/QSX 323 Christianity and Sexuality
REL 324 Religion and Storytelling
REL 326 Religion and Film
REL/JSP 337 Shoah: Responding to the Holocaust
REL/NAT 347 Religion and the Conquest of America
REL/NAT 348 Religion and American Consumerism
REL/QSX 357 Queerly Religious
REL 359/PHI/BIO 396 Stem Cells and Society
REL/WGS/SAS 384 Goddesses, Women and Power in Hinduism
REL 394/PHI 342 Sources of the Self: Finding the “I” in Religion & Philosophy
REL 395 Religions and the Natural Environment
REL 551/PHI 593 Ethics and the Health Professions
Russian
RUS/LIT 331 Russian Culture through Fiction and Film
Sociology
SOC 102 Social Problems
SOC/WGS 230 Intergroup Dialogue
SOC/WGS 248 Racial and Ethnic Inequalities
SOC/AAS 254 Comparative Study of American Ethnic Communities
SOC/WGS 281 Sociology of Families
SOC 301 Contemporary Asian Americans
SOC 305 Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOC/AAS 353 Sociology of the African American Experience
SOC/WGS 354/PSC 386 Gender, Militarism and War
SOC/WGS 364 Aging and Society
SOC/AAS 410 Seminar on Social Change
SOC/WGS 433 Race, Class, and Gender
SOC/QSX/WGS 456 LGBT Studies in Sociology
South Asian Studies
SAS/REL 283 India’s Religious Worlds
SAS/HST 328 Ancient and Medieval India
SAS/REL/WGS 384 Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism
SAS/ANT 426 Cultures and Politics of Afghanistan and Pakistan
Spanish
SPA 453 Subversive Imagination in 20th and 21st Century Spain
SPA 457 Civil War to Contemporary Spanish Literature and Culture
SPA/LAS 463 Contemporary Latin American Theater
SPA/LAS 465 Literature and Popular Culture
SPA/LAS/WGS475 Women, Myth and Nation in Latin American Literature
SPA/LAS 481 The Literature of Latinos in the United States
Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 101 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
WGS/ENG 192 Gender and Literary Texts
WGS 201 Global Feminisms
WGS/SOC 230 Intergroup Dialogue
WGS/SOC 248 Racial and Ethnic Inequalities
WGS 258 Poverty and Discrimination in America
WGS/SOC 281 Sociology of Families
WGS/PHI 297 Philosophy of Feminism
WGS/AAS 303 Black Women Writers
WGS/PSC 319 Gender and Politics
WGS 325 Economics and Gender
WGS/SWK 326 Persons in Social Context
WGS/SWK 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts
WGS/PSY 329 Biopsychological Perspectives on Women’s Health
WGS/LIT/LAS 343 Latina Feminist Theories
WGS/HST 349 Women in America: Civil War to Present
WGS/SOC 354/PSC 386 Gender, Militarism, and War
WGS/CFE 362 Youth, Schooling & Popular Culture
WGS/SOC 364 Aging and Society
WGS/ANT/GEO 367 Gender in a Globalizing World
WGS/SAS/REL 384 Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism
WGS/HST/QSX 389 LGBT History
WGS 395 Gender and Popular Culture
WGS/AAS 403 African and Caribbean Women Writers
WGS/PSC/PHI 413 Identity and Difference (Offered only in Florence)
WGS/SOC 433 Race, Class, and Gender
WGS/DSP 443 Intersectional Feminist Disability Studies
WGS/CFE 444 Schooling & Diversity
WGS 452 Feminism and Postcolonial Studies
WGS/ANT 455 Culture and Aids
WGS/QSX/SOC 456 LGBT Studies in Sociology
WGS/HOM 473 Women, Rap and Hip-Hop Feminism
WGS/LAS/SPA 475 Women, Myth and Nation in Latin American Literature
WGS/HOM 494 Music and Gender
WGS/AAS 512 African American Women’s History
Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
WRT 115 Writing, Rhetoric, and the Environment
WRT 116 Writing, Rhetoric, and Social Action
WRT 255 Advanced Argumentative Writing
WRT 301 Advanced Writing Studio: Civic Writing
WRT 304 Indigenous Writing and Rhetoric
WRT 413 Rhetoric and Ethics
WRT 423 African American Rhetoric
WRT 424 Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, Identity
WRT 428 Studies in Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy
WRT 440 Studies in the Politics of Language and Writing

School of Education
EDU 310/610 The American School
David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics
*HFS 467 Child and Family in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
*SWK 314 Social Welfare Policy and Services I
*SWK 315 Social Welfare Policy and Services II
SWK/WGS 326 Persons in Social Contexts
SWK/WGS 328 Human Diversity in Social Contexts
Martin J. Whitman School of Management
*LPP 467/767 Management and Ethics
Only available for students in the Renée Crown Honors Program and only when offered as the following topics
HNR 260/WGS 200 History of the Women's Suffrage Movement
HNR 260 Interrogation: Engine of Justice?
HNR 340 Good Film, Bad People
HNR 340/HNR 360/ANT 300 Folk Arts, Festival, and Public Display
HNR 340/HNR 360 Folk Art and Oral Traditions of India
HNR 340/HNR 360/ANT 300 Migrating Memories/Migrating Arts
HNR 340 American Parsifal
HNR 350 Linked Lenses: Science, Philosophy, and the Pursuit of Knowledge
HNR 360 Welcome to Your Future
HNR 360 Women’s Rights: A Native American Tradition
HNR 360/HST 347 Modern American Politics through Fiction

NOTE: Transfer and other credit are not accepted for the Critical Reflections requirement except when defined in articulation agreements

Part IV - IDEA Course Requirement #

Students are required to take two courses to fulfill the IDEA Course Requirement Many of these courses may simultaneously be used to partially satisfy other Liberal Arts Core requirements.

The IDEA course requirement provides undergraduate students the opportunity to explore concepts in social justice, broadly defined. The IDEA acronym encapsulates the core concepts of Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility. These concepts are integral to models of social justice, and through their examination students can learn about important values, voices, and lives that have been marginalized and erased, along with strategies to create stronger and more just communities.

Transfer and other credit are not accepted for the IDEA Requirement except when they are included in an Associate Degree as defined in articulation agreements.

IDEA courses may be taught in any of the schools and colleges at the university. They vary greatly in topic area and content.

In addition to satisfying the IDEA requirement in the student's program of study, IDEA courses may also satisfy other distributional, major or minor requirements. The IDEA requirement may be completed at any time, but students are encouraged to do so early in their curriculum if possible.