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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Philosophy Courses

Undergraduate and Graduate

Fall 2020

PHI 107: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
T/TH 11:00-11:55 Van Gulick, Robert

PHI 107.1: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
T/TH 11:00-12:30 Hedger, Joseph

PHI 107.2: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
MWF 12:45-1:40 Osborne, Chip

PHI 107.3: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
T/TH 12:30-1:50 Simmons, Byron

PHI 107.4: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
T/TH 8:00-9:20 Hedger, Joseph

PHI 107.5: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
T/TH 3:30-4:50 Simmons, Byron

PHI 107.6: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
MWF 11:40-12:35 Osborne, Chip

PHI 107.7: Theories of Knowledge and Reality
MW 3:45-5:05 Huang, Weiting

PHI 109: Intro. to Philosophy (Honors)
T/TH 9:30-10:50 Swiderski, Jan

PHI/PSC 125: Political Theory
T/TH 5:00-5:55 Morgan, Glyn

PHI 171: Critical Thinking
M/W 12:45-2:05 Patterson, Adam

Many people are poor critical thinkers. Many do not improve in college (Davies 2014). And if and when they do improve, it is likely due to personal maturation and not having taken any course on critical thinking (ibid). That isn’t awesome. For critical thinking, i.e., the ability to understand argumentative texts and reason clearly about them is an important skill for the job market (and life in general) that ​should be ​developed in college. The primary aim of this course is to improve your critical thinking skills.

PHI 175: Social and Political Philosophy
M/W 12:45-1:40 Anderson, Luvell

PHI 175.1: Social and Political Philosophy
T/TH 5:00-6:20 Koehler, Matt

PHI 175.2: Social and Political Philosophy
M/W 5:15-6:35 Cimendereli, Cagla

PHI 175.3: Social and Political Philosophy
T/TH 2:00-3:20 Ryan, Pam

PHI 191: The Meaning of Life
T/TH 12:30-1:25 Erlenbusch-Anderson, Verena

In the fourteenth century, when the plague ravaged much of Asia, North Africa, and Europe, roughly 200 million people died. For the Italian humanist Francesco Petrarch, the pandemic raised serious questions about the meaning of life and prompted him to examine his own life. Had the plague transformed him and others for the better? Was it possible to be happy amidst so much suffering, illness, and death? What was the meaning of love and friendship when so many loved ones had perished? What were the effects of quarantine, unemployment, and constrained mobility and sociality? Petrarch reflected on these questions in prayer as well as in conversation and correspondence with the living and the dead, in reflective essays, and in his poems. In this course, we will follow Petrarch’s lead to examine some of the most influential philosophical perspectives on the meaning of life and the role of pain and suffering, happiness and joy, love and friendship, work and play, faith, and mortality. They not only teach us how to live meaningful lives but also equip us with the skills to think independently and come to good judgments about what matters for us.

PHI 192: Introduction to Moral Theory
M/W 11:40-12:35 Paakkunainen, Hille

PHI 192.1: Introduction to Moral Theory
M/W 2:15-3:35 Cook, Ben

This course is an introduction to major theories about moral rightness and wrongness, about virtue and vice, and about value and disvalue. We examine historically influential theories in the Western philosophical tradition that continue to be of contemporary interest, such as utilitarian, Kantian, and Aristotelian theories. We also discuss applications of these theories to issues of contemporary import, such as our duties to non-human animals, the ethics of abortion, free speech, and reparations. We use both historical and contemporary readings.

PHI 192.2: Introduction to Moral Theory
M/W 3:45-5:05 Kohls, Stacy

PHI 192.4: Introduction to Moral Theory
T/TH 5:00-6:20 Javier-Castellanos, Arturo

PHI 192.5: Introduction to Moral Theory
T/TH 6:30-7:50 Javier-Castellanos, Arturo

PHI 197: Human Nature
T/TH 2:00-2:55 Noble, Christopher

What can we learn about happiness and a fulfilling life by thinking about human nature? What implications do facts about human nature have for morality, and how could facts about our nature have these implications? What role do reason and emotion play in determining human behavior, and can we act contrary to our beliefs? In this course we will explore these and other questions with the help of classics texts drawn from the Western philosophical tradition (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Hobbes, Kant, J. S. Mill, and Sartre) together with some works by contemporary philosophers (such as Susan Wolf, Peter Singer, and Sharon Street). The course will be organized around three main themes: Happiness, Ethics, and Motivation.

PHI 197.1: Human Nature
T/TH 11:00-12:20 Sethi, Neelam

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a variety of philosophical views concerning human nature. In light of these views we will examine a number of questions including the following: Are there distinctive characteristics of a human being? How are humans related to non-human beings? Is human nature fixed or changeable? How similar or different are the natures of men and women? What is a cyborg? Are humans basically evil or good? What is a good life? To answer these and other related questions, we will examine readings from literature, philosophy, and science.

PHI 197.2: Human Nature
T/TH 3:30-4:50 Ryan, Pam

PHI 197.3: Human Nature
M/W 12:45-2:05 Demirtas, Huzeyfe

PHI 245: Philosophy of Sport
M/W 3:45-5:05 Singh, Jagdeep

PHI 251: Logic
T/TH 2:00-2:55 Rieppel, Michael

In a good deductive argument the conclusion follows from the premises. But what exactly does this involve? Logic aims to answer that question by giving a mathematically precise account of the relation of logical consequence. In this course we will begin by first studying Truth-Functional Logic, and then move on to the more complex system of First-Order Logic. We will learn how to formally represent the logical structure of English arguments in each system, and develop a semantics as well as a system of natural deduction to determine the validity of arguments given such formal representations. Upon completing the course students will be familiar with basic model- and proof-theoretic concepts and techniques, and be able to apply them to analyze and evaluate natural language arguments.

PHI 251.1: Logic
T/TH 12:30-1:50 Dauksz, Dante

PHI 251.2: Logic
T/TH 2:00-3:20 Bzdak, David

PHI 251.3: Logic
T/TH 9:30-10:50 Pierce, Jeremy

PHI 251.4: Logic
M/W 3:45-5:05 Shirmohammadi, Hamed

Logic is the business of evaluating arguments; sorting the good from the bad. In a good deductive argument the conclusion follows from the premises. Such an argument is called a valid argument. Some arguments are valid in virtue of their logical form. Formal logic studies the logical form of arguments. In this course we will study two systems of formal logic: truth functional logic, and first-order logic. We will learn how to represent the logical forms of English arguments, and then develop a semantics as well as a system of natural deduction in each system of logic to determine the validity of arguments given such formal representations. Upon completing the course students will be familiar with basic model- and proof-theoretic concepts and techniques, and be able to apply them to analyze and evaluate natural language arguments.

PHI 251.5: Logic
M/W 5:15-6:35 Shirmohammadi, Hamed

PHI 293: Ethics & The Media Professions
T/TH 5:00-5:55 Prescott, Paul

Ethics and the Media Professions is an introduction to the ethical issues raised by the entertainment media, including television, radio, film, music, graphics, and photography. The goal of the course is to provide students with the resources and background required to recognize, navigate, and constructively respond to the ethical challenges confronted by entertainment media professionals.

PHI/WGS 297: Philosophy of Feminism
T/TH 2:00-3:20 Bell, Rose

PHI 300: Selected Topics - Philosophy of Life and Death
T/TH 9:30-10:50 Bradley, Ben

PHI 313: British Philosophy
T/TH 2:00-3:20 Dauksz, Dante

PHI 376: Philosophy of Mind
M/W 12:45-2:05 Edwards, Kevan

PHI 381: Metaphysics
M/W 2:15-3:35 Javier-Castellanos, Arturo

PHI 393: Contemporary Ethics
M/W 3:45-5:05 Tignor, Joshua

PHI 400/600: Selected Topics - Explaining Philosophy to Non-Philosophers
W 7:00-9:30 Gorovitz, Samuel

This 1-credit course will meet five times during the semester, always on Wednesdays from 7:00 - 9:45 pm. The sessions will be in person at a location to be determined, or on-line, or in some combination. Each student is expected to participate actively in all of each session. The sessions are scheduled for September 9, September 30, October 7, November 4, and December 9. The December 9 session will be on-line, and will feature each student’s final presentation.

PHI 411: Race and Identity
M/W 3:45-5:05 Anderson, Luvell

PHI 417/PSC 382: Contemporary Political Philosophy
T/TH 11:00-12:20 Erlenbusch-Anderson, Verena

This course examines the works of prominent contemporary political theorists through the lens of basic issues central to the organization of social and political life. In particular, we will consider how political theorists assess the benefits and dangers of surveillance for political life. We will examine justifications of surveillance as necessary for security and the prevention of crime, explore how surveillance interacts with the democratic process, and explore the effects of surveillance on fundamental rights such as freedom, privacy, and equality. Readings will include both theoretical works and immediately relevant political case studies.

PHI 451/651: Logic and Language
T/TH 9:30-10:50 Rieppel, Michael

The aim of this course is to provide students with a background in various concepts, methods, and results from mathematical logic that are of philosophical importance. We will study basic set theory, topics in the model- and proof-theory of propositional logic, first-order logic, and modal logic, and the application of formal techniques in the study of meaning in natural language.

PHI 593/REL 551: Ethics and Health Professions
W 4:30-7:30 Prescott, Paul

Ethics and the Health Professions is a graduate-level seminar on the ethical dimensions of healthcare. The goal of the course is to provide students with opportunities to discern philosophical fundamentals in various healthcare contexts. Topics range from the professional-patient relationship to the ethics of medical practice during the current pandemic.

PHI 687: Proseminar in LEMM
M/W 2:15-3:35 Edwards, Kevan

PHI 710: Sem. in Ancient & Medieval Philosophy - Freedom & Determination in Ancient Philosophy
W 3:45-6:30 Noble, Christopher

Are we responsible for our actions? Are we able to act freely? Are affirmative answers to these questions compatible with a deterministic world view or with divine foreknowledge? In this course, we will discuss responses to these and related questions on the part of ancient philosophers from Aristotle (4th cent B.C.) to Boethius (6th cent. A.D.). Throughout the course, we will engage in a close reading of ancient texts in translation together with selected scholarly literature.

PHI 750/PAI 700: Sem. in Current Phil. Problems - Ethics of Emerging Technology
T/TH 9:30-10:50 Himmelreich, Johannes

PHI 840: Seminar in Ethics - Free Will
T 3:30-6:15 Heller, Mark

PHI 860.1: Seminar in Ethics - Practical & Theoretical Reasoning
M 3:45-6:30 Paakkunainen, Hille

PHI 860.2: Seminar in Ethics - Alienation
TH 3:30-6:15 Singh, Keshav