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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Sarah Fuchs

Sarah Fuchs portrait

Assistant Professor

Music History and Cultures

Art and Music Histories

308 I Bowne Hall

315.443.4321

sefuchss@syr.edu


Research and Teaching Interests

Sarah Fuchs joined the Department of Art & Music Histories in 2016, the same year she received her PhD in Musicology from the Eastman School of Music. Her research considers how media technologies shaped musical culture over the long nineteenth century and how digital technologies affect the arts and humanities today.

Sarah’s current book project probes the relationship between center and periphery in fin-de-siècle France, exploring how the telephone, phonograph, and moving-picture camera enabled opera to travel from Paris to the provinces and—crucially—from the provinces to Paris. Her research has been supported by grants and fellowships from, among others, the American Association of University Women, the Houghton Library at Harvard University, and the Presser Foundation. Sarah has presented her research at national and international venues, including annual meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Royal Musical Association, and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, as well as the first three Transnational Opera Studies Conferences. Her essays have appeared in the Cambridge Opera Journal, Nineteenth-Century Music Review, and the edited collection London Voices, 1820–1840: Vocal Performers, Practices, Histories (eds. Roger Parker and Susan Rutherford).

Sarah has directed several digital projects over the past five years, including a network visualization of relationships between professors and pupils at the Paris Conservatoire, a sound map of Syracuse, NY, and an online exhibition devoted to théâtrophone. In 2018, she co-organized Syracuse University’s inaugural Digital Humanities Research Symposium, and—in collaboration with colleagues at the Eastman School of Music—she also started a working group focused on “Digital Humanities in Practice,” funded by the Central New York Mellon Humanities Corridor. In 2020, Sarah was appointed Director of Syracuse University’s Digital Humanities Integrated Learning Major.

Sarah has received a number of awards recognizing her excellence in teaching, including Syracuse University’s Meredith Teaching Recognition Award in 2019, the Eastman School of Music’s Teaching Assistant Prize in 2015, and the University of Rochester’s Edward Peck Curtis Award in 2014. At Syracuse University, Sarah teaches courses on nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century music history, many of which include a digital-culture component, and she welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and graduate students interested in pursuing independent research projects on topics located at the intersection of music, media, and performance studies.

Education

  • PhD in Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester (2016)
  • MM in Music History/Collaborative Piano, Ball State University (2010)
  • BM in Piano Performance, Taylor University (2007)

Courses

  • Debussy and His World
  • European Music History before 1800
  • European and American Music History after 1800
  • Film Music
  • Music, Space, and Place: Paris 1900
  • Operas of Verdi
  • Sound Culture

Selected Publications

Books

  • Opera on the Line: A Technological History of French Operatic Culture, 1870–1914. In progress.

Articles and Chapters in Edited Collections

Sarah Fuchs (2019). Chapter 4. The Castrato as Creator: Velluti’s Voice in the London Sheet-Music Market. In Roger Parker, Susan Rutherford (Eds.), London Voices, 1820–1840: Vocal Performers, Practices, Histories (pp. 71–92). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. https://doi.org/10.7208/9780226670218-005

‘Animating Antiquity in the Vision animée’. Special Issue on ‘Prima Donnas and Leading Men on the French Stage’, co-edited by Hilary Poriss and Kimberly White. Cambridge Opera Journal 30, 2-3 (November 2018): 115-37. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S095458671900003X

  • “Seeing More Clearly.” Special Issue on the Digital Humanities, edited by Heather Platt. Nineteenth-Century Music Review (forthcoming).
  • “Le tournant technologique de l’écoute: 1870–1914.” In Histoire de l’opéra française, Vol. 3, ed. Hervé Lacombe. Paris: Fayard. Invited and in preparation.

Fellowships and Grants

  • 2019–21: Syracuse University, CUSE Grant, $5000.
  • 2017–20: Central New York Mellon Humanities Corridor grant to fund working group on ‘Sound and Media’. Co-organizer with Darren Mueller, $8000.
  • 2018–19: Harvard University, Houghton Library, John M. Ward Fellowship in Dance and Music for the Theatre, $3600.
  • 2018–19: Central New York Mellon Humanities Corridor grant to fund working group on ‘Digital Humanities in Practice’. Co-organizer with Darren Mueller, $1500.
  • 2018: Syracuse University, Writing Across the Curriculum Fellowship, $3000.
  • 2015–16: American Association of University Women, American Dissertation Fellowship, $20000.
  • 2013: Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, Presser Music Award, $10000.

Awards and Honors

  • 2019: Syracuse University, Meredith Teaching Recognition Award, $3000.
  • 2015: Transnational Opera Studies Conference, Award for Best Paper by a Junior Scholar.
  • 2015: Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, Teaching Assistant Prize for Excellence in Teaching.
  • 2014: University of Rochester, Edward Peck Curtis Award for Excellence in Teaching by a Graduate Student.

Media Coverage

Inaugural Digital Humanities Research Symposium set for April 24

(April 19, 2018)

Student research within the digital space will be the focus of this campuswide event.

Eastman Museum Pianist to Discuss Music, Film in Silent Era Feb. 7

(Jan. 30, 2018)

Philip Carli will survey early 20th-century recordings by motion-picture musicians

Full Stream Ahead

(May 17, 2017)

Music historian Sarah Fuchs Sampson traces technology and access to opera

Upcoming Events

March 2020

‘Opera on the Line: French Operatic Culture in the Age of Sound Technology, 1870–1914.’

Seminar presentation at the University of Aberdeen.

April 2020

Keynote Presentation at the ‘Re-Soundings: Revisions, Reworkings, Remixes’ conference at Columbia University, New York, USA.