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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Austin M. Garner

Research Interests

Organismal attachment, functional morphology, biomechanics, anatomy, bio-inspired adhesion, biomimetics

Research Spotlight

The Garner Lab at Syracuse University studies the functional morphology and biomechanics of organismal attachment using geckos, anoles, and sea urchins as model systems. We are primarily interested in how form, function, environment, and behavior interact in these systems, and we employ an integrated and interdisciplinary approach in our field and laboratory investigations. Our works spans the fields of functional morphology, biomechanics, anatomy, materials science, physics, chemistry, ecology, and evolution. We are also interested in using the knowledge gained from our research to inform, improve, and assess the design of bio-inspired synthetic adhesives. The Garner Lab is actively recruiting undergraduate and graduate students for a Fall 2022 start date. Interested candidates are encouraged to reach out to Dr. Garner to discuss opportunities in the lab.

Education

  • Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Department of Biology, Villanova University (2021-2022)
  • Ph.D. in Integrated Bioscience, The University of Akron (2021)
  • B.Sc. in Biology, The University of Akron (2016)

Publications

The same but different: setal arrays of anoles and geckos indicate alternative approaches to achieving similar adhesive effectiveness.

Garner AM, Wilson MC, Wright C, Russell AP, Niewiarowski PH, Dhinojwala A. The same but different: setal arrays of anoles and geckos indicate alternative approaches to achieving similar adhesive effectiveness. J Anat. 2021 May;238(5):1143-1155. doi: 10.1111/joa.13377. Epub 2020 Dec 14. PMID: 33319377; PMCID: PMC8053591.

Tokay geckos (Gekkonidae: Gekko gecko) preferentially use substrates that elicit maximal adhesive performance.

Garner AM, Pamfilie AM, Dhinojwala A, Niewiarowski PH. Tokay geckos (Gekkonidae: Gekko gecko) preferentially use substrates that elicit maximal adhesive performance. J Exp Biol. 2021 Feb 25;224(Pt 4):jeb241240. doi: 10.1242/jeb.241240. PMID: 33504587.

Garner, A.M. and A.P. Russell. 2021. Revisiting the classification of squamate adhesive setae: historical, morphological, and functional perspectives. Royal Society Open Science 8: 202039.

Russell, A.P. and A.M. Garner. 2021. Setal field transects, evolutionary transitions and gecko-anole convergence provide insights into the fundamentals of form and function of the digital adhesive system of lizards. Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering 6:1-17.

Garner, A.M., C. Buo, J.M. Piechowski, A.M. Pamfilie, S.R. Stefanovic, A. Dhinojwala, and P.H. Niewiarowski. 2019. Digital hyperextension has no influence on the active self-drying of gecko adhesive subdigital pads. Journal of Experimental Zoology – Part A 333(2): 118-125.

Cohn, E., P. Cole, A. Haymaker, A.M. Garner, and R.L. Londraville. 2019. Response to Underwater Laser Pointer in the Orange-Finned Anemonefish Amphiprion chrysopterus and Three-spot Damselfish Dascyllus trimaculatus. Journal of Fish Biology 96: 274-277.

Gamel, K.M., A.M. Garner, and B.E. Flammang. Bioinspired remora adhesive disc offers insight into evolution. 2019. Bioinspiration & Biomimetics 14(5): 1-8.

Niewiarowski, P.H., A. Dhinojwala, and A.M. Garner. 2019. Adapting a thermal physical model approach to estimate gecko adhesion performance opportunity and constraint: How rough could it be? Integrative and Comparative Biology 59(1): 203-213.

McInerney, S.J., B. Khakipoor, A.M. Garner, T. Houette, C.K. Unsworth, A. Rupp, N. Weiner, J.F.V. Vincent, J.K.S. Nagel, and P.H. Niewiarowski. 2018. E2BMO: Facilitating User Interaction with a BioMimetic Ontology via Semantic Translation and Interface Design. Designs 2(4): 53.

Garner, A.M., S.M. Lopez, and P.H. Niewiarowski. 2017. Brown anole (Anolis sagrei) adhesive forces remain unaffected by partial claw clipping. Acta Herpetologica 12:133-137.

Garner, A.M., A.Y. Stark, S.A. Thomas, and P.H. Niewiarowski. 2017. Geckos go the Distance: Water's Effect on the Speed of Adhesive Locomotion in Geckos. Journal of Herpetology 51:240-244.