Orange Alert

Art and Music History Course Offerings

Previous Semesters
Spring 2023

Undergraduate and Graduate Art (HOA) and Music (HOM) courses

Linked course titles have extended descriptions. Syllabi provided where available.
Course Title Day Time Instructor Room Syllabus Description
HOA 100 M001 ST: World Art and Religion TTH 2:00 PM-3:20 PM Peers, Glenn This introductory course aims to provide students with an understanding and appreciation of ways in which art has played a role in our history and in our lives. In this class, we’re particularly interested in the aesthetic, social and ideological meanings of art and religion, and we’ll be using that set of themes to talk about and look at various aspects of what makes ‘art history.’ We’ll be focusing on exhibitions and museums here on campus from this same point of view, that is, the connections between religion and art. And we’ll use permanent and temporary exhibitions as ways not only to understand what art means and does, but also how museums help and hinder that significant work.
HOA 106 M001 Art & Ideas II TTH 12:30 PM-1:25 PM Johnson, Sam Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M002 Art & Ideas II discussion F 11:40 AM-12:35 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M003 Art & Ideas II discussion F 9:30 AM-10:25 AM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M004 Art & Ideas II discussion F 10:35 AM-11:30 AM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M005 Art & Ideas II discussion F 11:40 AM-12:35 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M006 Art & Ideas II discussion F 12:45 PM-1:40 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M007 Art & Ideas II discussion W 10:35 AM-11:30 AM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M008 Art & Ideas II discussion W 3:45 PM-4:40 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M009 Art & Ideas II discussion W 5:15 PM-6:10 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M010 Art & Ideas II discussion W 10:35 AM-11:30 AM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M011 Art & Ideas II discussion W 11:40 AM-12:35 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M012 Art & Ideas II discussion W 12:45 PM-1:40 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 106 M013 Art & Ideas II discussion W 2:15 PM-3:10 PM TA- Register for one Discussion M002-M013; Section M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from the renaissance through the present day that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, societal values, technology, and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOM 125 M001 Introductory Music Theory I TTH 9:30 AM-10:50 AM Dubaniewicz VPA course crosslisted with MTC 125, For Students With Little or No Music Theory Background. Elementary note reading, meter, intervals; diatonic harmony including key signatures, major & minor scales, triads, 7th chords and accompanying chord symbols. For non-music majors only.
HOM 125 M002 Introductory Music Theory I TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Dubaniewicz VPA course crosslisted with MTC 125, For Students With Little or No Music Theory Background. Elementary note reading, meter, intervals; diatonic harmony including key signatures, major & minor scales, triads, 7th chords and accompanying chord symbols. For non-music majors only.
HOM 126 M001 Introductory Music Theory II TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Dubaniewicz VPA course crosslisted with MTC 126, For Students Who Have Already Completed HOM 125 or Have Comparable Skills. Harmonic & melodic minor scales, compound intervals, modes, C clefs, symmetrical scales, dynamics, harmonic series, instrument transpositions, form, cadences, part writing. For non-music majors only.
HOM 166 M001 Understanding Music II MW 2:15 PM-3:35 PM Wang, Serena Introduction to the art of music. Musical styles from early baroque to the 20th century, stressing the characteristic interests and achievements of each historical epoch. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.
HOM 166 M002 Understanding Music II MW 3:45 PM-5:05 PM Wang, Serena Introduction to the art of music. Musical styles from early baroque to the 20th century, stressing the characteristic interests and achievements of each historical epoch. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.
HOM 166 M003 Understanding Music II TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Wang, Serena Introduction to the art of music. Musical styles from early baroque to the 20th century, stressing the characteristic interests and achievements of each historical epoch. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.
HOM 268 M001 European and American Music Since 1800 TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Staff Pre-requisites: Any completed HOM or MHL class and able to read music. Crosslisted with MHL 268. Major trends and figures in art music in the United States and Europe since 1800. Topics include nationalism, neoclassicism, serialism, indeterminacy, and minimalism. Assumes basic knowledge of music.
HOM 285 M002 Introduction to World Music TTH 9:30 AM-10:50 AM Wang, Serena Crosslisted w/ MHL 185. Introduction to world music in its social, political, and cultural contexts, with an emphasis on building listening and analytic skills. Intended primarily for music and music history and culture majors.
HOA 300 M002 ST: Contemporary Photography since 1970 MW 5:15 PM-6:35 PM Innes, Maggie This course surveys contemporary photography of the last fifty years, beginning with postmodernist practices of the 1970s and moving into the digital era. During these tumultuous decades, photography has been reinvented many times over. In this class we will attend to the ways that artists and theorists from around the world have used the medium to picture the present and imagine new futures. Class readings and discussions will introduce students to a range of practices and theoretical frameworks, from postmodernism to post-formalism to postcolonial and decolonial theories, allowing us to probe the connections between photography, aesthetics, and politics.
HOA 300 M003 ST: Avant-Garde Art, 1905-1945 TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Johnson, Sam In the first half of the 20th century, a self-identified “advanced guard” of culture embraced the experiences of novelty, speed, fragmentation, and simultaneity as a new basis for painting and sculpture. These artists turned to a mass-media environment of moving images and illustrated magazines as a means to reach a far larger audience than ever before. They embraced political transformations both revolutionary and reactionary. They pushed individual expression beyond the threshold of the conscious mind. In doing so, they permanently transformed the role of the visual arts around the globe. This course will survey celebrated and obscure avant-garde movements, including Fauvism, Expressionism and Cubism; Dada, Constructivism, and Surrealism; Futurism, Mavo and Antropofagia. It treats developments in Paris, Moscow, Mexico City, Berlin, Sao Paolo, Tokyo, and New York, focusing especially on the cultural effects of the first World War, revolutions in Mexico and Russia, and the civil war in Spain. Class discussions center on problems of abstract art, sculptural assemblage, political propaganda, and the fate of tradition in an age of mass culture.
HOA 300 M004 ST: East Asian Art, Chinese Painting, c. 700-1800 TTH 9:30 AM-10:50 AM Yan, Weitian This course is a survey of key monuments in the history of painting in China. Students will examine paintings of varied mediums, including mural, handscroll, hanging scroll, screen, album leaf, fan, and illustrated book. In lectures, we will explore the context in which these paintings were made, the development of personal styles, as well as the reception of these paintings. Additionally, students will discuss and analyze important recent literature in the field.
HOA 300 M005 ST: Plant Worlds: Visualizing, Making, and Imagining with Plants MW 3:45 PM-5:05 PM Ray, Romita This course will examine the visual cultures of plants with a focus on the interconnected histories of art, design, and science. We will study plants in botanical illustration, garden design, landscape painting, forest spaces, architecture, material culture, and advertising. We will look at the legacies of imperialism, study the impact of climate change and deforestation, and consider the forces of transnational capitalism—all with regard to plants, which have long been transformed into lucrative commodities. This course will involve field trips to the Special Collections Research Center and the Syracuse University Art Museum.
HOM 300 M002 ST: Music in Science Fiction and Fantasy MW 2:15 PM-3:35 PM Staff This course will introduce students to the soundtracks of film and television categorized broadly under the genres of science fiction and fantasy. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between music and the moving image through current scholarship and media viewings.
HOA 320 M001 Italian Renaissance Art MW 2:15 PM-3:35 PM Cornelison, Sally Survey of Italian art and architecture from c. 1200 to 1550 with an emphasis on style, patronage, artistic techniques, and the social, political, and devotional contexts of works by major artists and architects.
HOM 373 M001 History of Musical Theater MW 3:45 PM-5:05 PM Staff Musical theater within a larger cultural context. European roots of musical theater before turning to an analysis of Anglo-American musical theater in the 20th and 21st centuries. This course will cover the history of musical theatre, from its roots in opera to its current form on Broadway. Students will watch and analyze musicals in context of past and present performances and musical theatre scholarship.
HOM 376 M001 Hip-Hop Studies TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Opara, Ruth An examination of the musical, historical, cultural, social, and political aspects of hip-hop within various contexts.
HOM 396 M001 Junior Seminar - Writing about Music MW 12:45 PM-2:05 PM Winkler, Amanda Eubanks MH&C Major or Minor or instructor permission. Students learn to research and write about music for a variety of written genres and a wide range of audiences, both academic and public.
HOA/NAT/HUM 400 M001 ST: Indigenizing Museums: Problems and Interventions TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Scott, Sascha and Stevens, Scott Meets with HOA 600, NAT 400, HUM 600 This interdisciplinary course will be co-taught by Prof. Sascha Scott (Art History) and Prof. Scott Stevens (Director of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Program) and will focus on museums that have collections of Indigenous visual and material culture. We will study the contested histories of these museums, including how they came to possess such collections. We will learn about major critiques of these museums overtime and about present-day interventions that seek to indigenize museums. We will also learn about Indigenous cultural centers that have long offered alternatives to traditional museums. This course will include visits to museums and Indigenous cultural centers. Four class sessions will be led by Prof. Jolene Rickard (Tuscarora Nation) from Cornell University. Prof. Rickard will discuss her work as an artist, curator, and cultural critic, and will give a public lecture on exhibitions as a form of Indigenous activism.
HOA 400 M002 ST: Crusader Art TTH 9:30 AM-10:50 AM Peers, Glenn Meets with HOA 600: M002 This class examines art and architecture produced when medieval Christians sought to claim and then possess land considered holy or dispossess non-Christians of desirable land. It takes the Holy Land experience of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the center of this medieval phenomenon of crusading, but it treats areas of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean also conquered and controlled by crusaders, like Cyprus, Greece and Sicily. It also looks at art and architecture produced in Western Europe in reaction to successes and failures of crusading. Such issues continue to resonate at a time of conflict and competition in the Middle East still, and the art history of the Middle Ages is an important means for understanding contemporary events.
HOM 400 M001 ST: Music in Africa TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Opara, Ruth Meets with HOM 600: M001 In “Music in Africa,” we will use specific regional cases—West, North, Central, East, South, and Black Atlantic to introduce students to the stylistic dynamism in African music. We will explore how Africans create their music, how music is used, what music means to practitioners, and connections in the diaspora. This approach aims to not only introduce students to different musical cultures but also expose them to the cultural roots of African societies and their experiences in their “new worlds” through music. Students will be able to understand basic world music elements such as rhythm, melody, texture, form, timbre, and pitch and apply their understanding to the music of Africa. They will become aware of defining African musical characteristics and develop critical listening skills that will enable them to analyze a piece—including identifying the instruments used and the type of ensemble, define and identify African musical styles and genres from the different regions, and examine the historical, social, economic, religious, political and intellectual implications of each style and genre.
HOA 500 M001 ST: Documentary Forms M 9:30 AM-12:15 PM Innes, Maggie Since the 1930s, received ideas of documentary have been closely bound up with notions of photographic transparency, evidence, and "the real." Yet to this day, there is little consensus regarding what documentary is or whether the concept itself remains useful. Beginning in the early twentieth century and working our way through the present, this class explores how ideas of the document and documentary have impacted photographic and lens-based artistic production around the world, with an eye toward assessing documentary's renewal in our own moment. We will focus on case studies drawn from the 1920s-1930s, 1960s-1970s, and 2000s-10s, with a special emphasis on how histories and theories of documentary have been invented and rewritten at these key conjunctures.
HOA 500 M002 ST: Art & Architecture at SU MW 12:45 PM-2:05 PM Ray, Romita SU is a treasure trove of works by famous artists and architects. In this course, we will explore key collections of art (paintings, prints, sculpture, and photographs) in the Special Collections at Bird Library, the SU Art Museum, and in the outdoor spaces of our campus. We will also study some important examples of architecture at SU. Some of the artists and architects we will look at are Hyacinthe Rigaud, Sir Joshua Reynolds, William Blake, Henri Matisse, Anna Hyatt Huntington, Margaret Bourke White, Marcel Breuer, Ben Shahn, and I. M. Pei. We will also study a unique collection of folk art from India in the SU Art Museum, which will be displayed in Take Me to the Palace of Love (Jan 19 – May 15, 2023), an exhibition of internationally acclaimed artist Rina Banerjee’s work at the museum. You will learn connoisseurship skills, present ideas and questions that they will generate in connection with the objects/buildings, and read a wide variety of sources that pertain to the works of art we will be studying together.
HOA 500 M003 ST: Art & Architecture in Modern Latin America T 5:00 PM-7:45 PM Staff This course will use art and architecture as a lens to better understand Latin America's social, political, cultural, and economic history in the 20th century. Weekly themes will include changes in conceptual art, new forms of media, indigenous technologies, modern architecture, housing, and urban design. The readings and discussions in this seminar will situate art and architecture within a variety of political regimes, including revolutionary governments, military dictatorships, and the contemporary neoliberal state. Not only will we focus on the ideas of artists and architects but also on how these aesthetic and technological processes have been shaped by non-elites, such as laborers, students, and everyday citizens.
HOA/HUM 600 M001 ST: Indigenizing Museums: Problems and Interventions TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Scott, Sascha and Stevens, Scott Meets with HOA 400, NAT 400, HUM 600 This interdisciplinary course will be co-taught by Prof. Sascha Scott (Art History) and Prof. Scott Stevens (Director of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Program) and will focus on museums that have collections of Indigenous visual and material culture. We will study the contested histories of these museums, including how they came to possess such collections. We will learn about major critiques of these museums overtime and about present-day interventions that seek to indigenize museums. We will also learn about Indigenous cultural centers that have long offered alternatives to traditional museums. This course will include visits to museums and Indigenous cultural centers. Four class sessions will be led by Prof. Jolene Rickard (Tuscarora Nation) from Cornell University. Prof. Rickard will discuss her work as an artist, curator, and cultural critic, and will give a public lecture on exhibitions as a form of Indigenous activism.
HOA 600 M002 ST: Crusader Art TTH 9:30 AM-10:50 AM Peers, Glenn Meets with HOA 400: M002 This class examines art and architecture produced when medieval Christians sought to claim and then possess land considered holy or dispossess non-Christians of desirable land. It takes the Holy Land experience of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the center of this medieval phenomenon of crusading, but it treats areas of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean also conquered and controlled by crusaders, like Cyprus, Greece and Sicily. It also looks at art and architecture produced in Western Europe in reaction to successes and failures of crusading. Such issues continue to resonate at a time of conflict and competition in the Middle East still, and the art history of the Middle Ages is an important means for understanding contemporary events.
HOM 600 M001 ST: Music in Africa TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Opara, Ruth Meets with HOM 400, M001 In “Music in Africa,” we will use specific regional cases—West, North, Central, East, South, and Black Atlantic to introduce students to the stylistic dynamism in African music. We will explore how Africans create their music, how music is used, what music means to practitioners, and connections in the diaspora. This approach aims to not only introduce students to different musical cultures but also expose them to the cultural roots of African societies and their experiences in their “new worlds” through music. Students will be able to understand basic world music elements such as rhythm, melody, texture, form, timbre, and pitch and apply their understanding to the music of Africa. They will become aware of defining African musical characteristics and develop critical listening skills that will enable them to analyze a piece—including identifying the instruments used and the type of ensemble, define and identify African musical styles and genres from the different regions, and examine the historical, social, economic, religious, political and intellectual implications of each style and genre.
HOA 757 M001 Art History Symposium Project TBD Cornelison, Sally All main campus candidates for the M.A. degree in art history participate in the Symposium Project in their final semester of study. This 3-credit-hour course gives graduate students experience in the research, writing, and oral presentation of a substantial and original scholarly work. The Symposium Project requires intensive expenditure of effort and time, both in scheduled class meetings and in private consultations with faculty advisors.