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Syracuse University, College of Arts and Sciences

Art and Music History Course Offerings

Previous Semesters

Fall 2021

Undergraduate and Graduate Art (HOA) and Music (HOM) courses

Linked course titles have extended descriptions. Syllabi provided where available.
Course Title Day Time Instructor Room Syllabus Description
HOA 105 M001 Art & Ideas I TTH 12:30 PM-1:25PM Peers, Glenn Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M002 Art & Ideas I discussion W 8:25 AM-9:20 AM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M003 Art & Ideas I discussion W 9:30 AM-10:25 AM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M004 Art & Ideas I discussion W 10:35 AM-11:30 AM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M005 Art & Ideas I discussion W 10:35 AM-11:30 AM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M006 Art & Ideas I discussion W 11:40 AM-12:35 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M007 Art & Ideas I discussion W 12:45 PM-1:40 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M008 Art & Ideas I discussion W 2:15 PM-3:10 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M009 Art & Ideas I discussion W 3:45 PM-4:40 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M010 Art & Ideas I discussion F 10:35 AM-11:30 AM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M011 Art & Ideas I discussion F 11:40 AM-12:35 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M012 Art & Ideas I discussion F 12:45 PM-1:40 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOA 105 M013 Art & Ideas I discussion F 2:15 PM-3:10 PM Reg for one Disc M002-M013; M001 will auto-enroll. Introductory overview of art and architecture from antiquity through the late medieval period that emphasizes how visual culture relates to historical and intellectual circumstances, society values, technology and diverse and changing identities. Repeatable 1 time(s), 3 credits maximum
HOM 125 M001 Introductory Music Theory I TBA TBA Dubaniewicz VPA course crosslisted with MTC 125 Elementary note reading, meter, intervals; diatonic harmony including key signatures, major & minor scales, triads, 7th chords and accompanying chord symbols. For non-music majors only.
HOM 125 M002 Introductory Music Theory I TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Dubaniewicz VPA course crosslisted with MTC 125 Elementary note reading, meter, intervals; diatonic harmony including key signatures, major & minor scales, triads, 7th chords and accompanying chord symbols. For non-music majors only.
HOM 165 M002 Understanding Music I - Lecture MW 2:35 PM-3:35 PM Staff Introduction to the art of music. Development of musical styles in the West from ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.
HOM 165 M006 Understanding Music I - Lecture TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Staff Introduction to the art of music. Development of musical styles in the West from ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.
HOM 172 M001 American Popular Music MW 3:45 PM-5:05 PM Cateforis, Theo The history of American popular music from the 19th century to more recent developments.
HOA 176 M001 Visual Arts - Americas TTH 2:00 PM-3:20 PM Scott, Sascha The visual arts in the Americas (South, Central, and North America) from contact to the present, emphasizing diversity of makers and media, as well as exchanges among cultural traditions.
HOM 267 M001 European Music before 1800 TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Winkler, Amanda Eubanks Crosslisted with MHL 267 European music before 1800 in its cultural and philosophical contexts. Extensive listening. Analytical focus on selected composers and works. Presupposes familiarity with musical notation, terms, and contexts.
HOA 300 M001 ST: Art After the Second World War TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Johnson, Sam In the years before the second World War, avant-garde artists in Europe and around the globe had optimistically participated in transformative projects to remake the whole of human existence in a suitably modern guise. But the horrors of the war, culminating in Nazi concentration camps and American nuclear aggression, put the virtues of modernity in question. How could cultural activities go on in the wake of such traumas? Could artistic practice avoid Theodor Adorno’s conclusion that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric”? This class focuses on the imbrication of the visual arts in Cold-War cultural politics and decolonial struggles around the world. Students will compare responses in to American cultural and political hegemony in Europe and Japan, resistance to European colonialism in Africa and Latin America, and non-conformism in the mass societies of the U.S. and USSR. Artistic practices will include painting and performance; sculpture and object-based installation; photography and appropriation.
HOA 300 M002 ST: Art/Arch. Jewish Sacred Space MW 5:15 PM-6:35 PM Gruber, Sam meets w/ JSP 300, M016 and REL 300, M002 This course will investigate the development of a wide range of sacred spaces recognized in Judaism, from those described in the Bible to those designed and built today, or those appropriated when needed for Jewish use. This involves the Jerusalem temple(s), but most of the course will focus on the architectural, artistic and liturgical development of the synagogue and ancillary spaces as well as on cemeteries and memorial spaces. We will discuss how sacred spaces are designed, used, interpreted, adapted and preserved. The notion of the sacred – and by extension sacred places and spaces – has varied over time and place and between cultures. For some these places are distinctly linked to the Divine (however that might be perceived). For others, they are more broadly understood as appropriate, designated and respected places for the practice of religion. In Judaism sacred spaces have served both roles, since the practice of Judaism involves both engagement with the Divine and the more mundane but constant practice of maintaining a functional society (albeit one traditionally organized to follow divinely inspired rules). For almost two thousand years the synagogue has been the focal point of Jewish life and identity. Architecturally, it has been the most prominent of Jewish buildings, for Jews and non-Jews. As the ceremonial center of Jewish life in the Diaspora, it has also been the locus for Jewish ritual art - the primary artistic expressions of Jewish patrons and artists throughout the centuries. By following the development of the architecture and art of the synagogue throughout the ages and across continents, we will examine several themes, including what defines Jewish art, what role art and architecture have played in Jewish history and life, and to what degree has interaction with Christian and Muslim cultures determined the production and appearance of Jewish art. We will consider the institution and the building of the synagogue in its historical, religious, and cultural context, and will consider its development from the points of view function, symbolism, design, aesthetic, liturgy, gender, politics, geography and more.
HOA 312 M001 Art, Arch & the Supernatural MW 2:15 PM-3:35 PM Mateo, Matilde European art and architecture of the 11th and 12th centuries explored in their cultural, social, and artistic contexts.
HOM 313 M001 Film Music TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Fuchs, Sarah Survey of film music, from the era of silent film to the present day.
HOM 314 M001 Music Videos from MTV to Today TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Staff A critical and historical examination of music videos from the 1980s to today.
HOM 379 M001 Indie Music MW 12:45 PM-2:05 PM Cateforis, Theo A historical, musical and cultural examination of “indie” or independent rock and pop music within various contexts.
HOA 389 M001 Islamic Architecture MW 3:45 PM-5:05 PM Henderson crosslisted w/ARC 435 Major building traditions of Islam in the Middle East, North Africa, Spain, Turkey, and India elucidated through in-depth examination of major works and principles of architectural, urban, and garden design. Additional work required of graduate students. PREREQ: HOA 105 OR ARC 134 OR CAS 134
HOA 396 M001 Art & Architecture of India TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Ray, Romita crosslisted with ARC 331, SAS 396 Art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent from the Indus Valley Civilization to the present.
HOM 400 M001 ST: Music, Space and Place TTH 2:00 PM-3:20 PM Fuchs, Sarah Meets with HOM 600 In 1935, the German Jewish philosopher Walter Benjamin described Paris (where he was then living in exile) as the “capital of the nineteenth century,” a phrase—and a sentiment—scholars across disciplines have often repeated and refracted: Paris has been characterized as the capital of art, fashion, pleasure, science, crime, revolution, modernity, even the entire world. In this seminar, we will consider—and occasionally challenge—Paris’s centrality during the long nineteenth century (as well as scholars’ continued commitment to this view) through the lens of music. What can music tell us about social, political, colonial, technological, and archaeological efforts to position Paris at the center of the nineteenth-century world—or, indeed, to undermine Paris’s claims to national or international centrality? Seminar participants will explore musical responses to the city’s revolutionary uprisings, geopolitical skirmishes, colonial conquests, communication networks, urban design, and archaeological projects through secondary historical and musicological literature, study relevant musical works, engage in discussions and debates, and conduct a related research project.
HOA 410 M001 Art and Ideology in Medieval Spain MW 5:15 PM-6:35 PM Mateo, Matilde Examines works of art and architecture from Medieval Spain, within their multicultural Christian/Islamic/Jewish context. Emphasizing their ideological value as vehicles for identity, authority, and spiritual ideals.
HOA 445 M001 Baroque Art in Southern Europe MW 12:45 PM-2:05 PM Franits, Wayne Painting and sculpture in Italy and Spain during the 17th century; Caravaggio, the Carracci, Bernini, Poussin, Lorrain, and Velázquez.
HOA 454 M001 The Architeture of Revolutions MW 2:15 PM-3:35 PM Bedard crosslisted w/ ARC 334/634 Survey of European architectural theory and practice from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth century. Discussion and analysis of major architects, buildings, and architectural treatises, principally from France, England, and Germany. Additional work required of graduate students.
HOA 475 M001 Modern Arch: Intnl Styl-prsnt MW 12:45 PM-2:05 PM Henderson crosslisted w/ ARC 436 Architecture of the modern period since World War II. Major works and figures as framed by the larger architectural issues of the period. Additional work required of graduate students.
HOM 493 M001 Music and Identity TTH 11:00 AM-12:20 PM Staff A critical study of the intersections of music and various types of identites in the world today, such as individual, ethnic, gender, religious, national, and commercial.
HOM 497 M001 Music and Politics TTH 3:30 PM-4:50 PM Staff Western art music, popular music, and world music as political/ cultural forces. Music as a political discourse. Music and meaning.
HOA 498 M001 Art History Senior Seminar TTH 12:30 PM-1:50 PM Ray, Romita Research, writing, and career exploration for senior art history majors. Students develop, edit, and revise texts spanning professional practices in art history.
HOA 500 M001 ST: Late Antique Art: From Jesus to T 3:30 PM-6:15 PM Peers, Glenn No prerequisites or even experiences of art are needed for this class! This course aims to introduce a period of great complexity, the transitional period between the Classical and Medieval worlds. The designation 'Late Antique' is necessarily vague because the transition was drawn out and often without firm definition. The exchange among cultures in this period was dynamic, and this course examines the art of Late Antiquity as a contest of cultures. In this period, art was an effective means of self-definition for Christians, pagans, Muslims and Jews alike. This course examines the tentative beginning of a Christian art and architecture beginning around 200. It follows the progress of this new art through its attempts at incorporation and alterations of pagan and Jewish art, and it follows the growth of this visual identity to its fully Christian realization into the seventh century. This broad period encompasses changes that profoundly affected the history of Europe thereafter: a truly Christian art and architecture supplanted the old forms of the pagan world. Meanwhile, Jews within the empire and Persians outside were each contending with the Roman past that allowed them to assert their own statuses and identities. The course ends with an examination of another process of supplanting and appropriation: the Islamicization from the 630s of large parts of the formerly Christian world of the Eastern Mediterranean. The Roman Christian world was itself overthrown by the forces of Islam from the east, but as Christians had not erased the past, neither did Muslims. A dynamic and compelling culture grew out of these opposing forces, a culture that has lessons of accommodation and antagonism useful for us today.
HOA 577 M001 Intro to Preservation MW 8:00 AM-9:20 AM Bartlett crosslisted with ARC 566 Problems and methods in implementing continued use for quality segments of the humanly built environment.
HOA 600 M001 ST: Caravaggio and His School M 3:45 PM-6:30 PM Franits, Wayne Art History Grad Students OR Instructor Consent. This seminar will examine the life and work of the famous Italian painter, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) as well as his influence upon artists of all nationalities, who flocked to Rome in large numbers during the opening decades of the seventeenth century. The latter group, now known as the Caravaggisti, includes such masters as Bartolomeo Manfredi, Jusepe de Ribera, Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi. The course will consist of lectures, discussions of assigned readings, and seminar reports by its participants. A reading knowledge of French and/or Italian would be helpful for conducting research in connection with the seminar report (and related term paper) though they are NOT REQUIRED.
HOM 600 M001 ST: Music, Space and Place TTH 2:00 PM-3:20 PM Fuchs, Sarah Meets with HOM 400 In 1935, the German Jewish philosopher Walter Benjamin described Paris (where he was then living in exile) as the “capital of the nineteenth century,” a phrase—and a sentiment—scholars across disciplines have often repeated and refracted: Paris has been characterized as the capital of art, fashion, pleasure, science, crime, revolution, modernity, even the entire world. In this seminar, we will consider—and occasionally challenge—Paris’s centrality during the long nineteenth century (as well as scholars’ continued commitment to this view) through the lens of music. What can music tell us about social, political, colonial, technological, and archaeological efforts to position Paris at the center of the nineteenth-century world—or, indeed, to undermine Paris’s claims to national or international centrality? Seminar participants will explore musical responses to the city’s revolutionary uprisings, geopolitical skirmishes, colonial conquests, communication networks, urban design, and archaeological projects through secondary historical and musicological literature, study relevant musical works, engage in discussions and debates, and conduct a related research project.
HOA 620 M001 Seminar: Art and Affect in Late Renaissance Italy F 12:45 PM-3:30 PM Staff Art History Grad Students only. European art of the 15th and 16th centuries. This seminar investigates Renaissance theories and practices of viewer response. It examines Renaissance expectations concerning how sacred and profane images induced varied sensory and somatic responses in beholders from altering mood or inspiring awe, to healing and consolation, considering these in relation to the methods artists developed to heighten affect through style and technique. Students will study both primary and secondary sources. Repeatable
HOA 655 M001 Graduate Research & Writing T 9:30 AM-12:15 PM Scott, Sascha Art History Grad Students OR Instructor Consent. This proseminar teaches graduate students in art history the research methods and scholarly writing skills required to be successful M.A. candidates and to become competitive professionals in art history and related fields. To this end, this course provides extensive training to develop students’ skills in the following three areas: writing, research, and presentation. We will hone these skills by curating an exhibition about the art and the environment for the SU Art Museum.
HOA 656 M001 Literature of Art Criticism TH 3:30 PM-6:15 PM Johnson, Sam Art History Florence Program graduate students, second-year Art History graduate students, or instructor consent. This course prepares graduate students for advanced studies in history of the visual arts by examining some major contributions to the rigorous study visual artifacts. Since the practice of writing about art’s history is older than the academic discipline of art history, the literature of art criticism includes texts from a variety of humanistic studies, including history, literature, philosophical aesthetics, psychology, and linguistics, all of which have influenced the discipline at various times. In addition to its focus on the fundamental art historical concepts of style and iconography, this course reviews the debates in contemporary scholarship that are sometimes grouped under the heading of postmodernism (feminist, structuralist and post-structuralist, and post-colonial approaches) or visual culture studies. Course readings will familiarize students with some central theoretical problems in the interpretation of artworks and their ramifications in the field.