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Leonard Newman, Ph.D.

Leonard Newman, Ph.D.


Associate Professor and Associate Chair
Psychology

lsnewman@syr.edu

515 Huntington Hall
315.443.4633


Education

M.A. & Ph.D., New York University, Social-Personality Psychology
B.A., Cornell University, Government

Research and Teaching Interests

How do people resolve the ambivalent feelings they have about members of other groups? What mental maneuvers do people use to shield themselves from threats to their self-concepts? How do people deal with having violated their moral and other behavioral standards? At the broadest level, my research focuses on the motivational aspects of social cognition. More specific interests include dehumanization, social stigma, defensive and self-protective processes in judgment and memory, and the social psychology of genocide and mass killing.

Representative Publications

Newman, L. S., Tan, M., Caldwell, T. L., Duff, K. J., & Winer, E. S. (In Press). Name norms: A guide to casting your next experiment. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Newman, L. S., Eccleston, C. P., & Oikawa, M. (2017). Ignoring biased feedback: Membership in a stigmatized group as a moderator of mnemic neglect. Journal of Social Psychology, 157, 152-164.

Tang, Y., & Newman, L. S. (2016). Do beliefs about psychologists’ political biases matter? Perceived political ideology moderates how laypeople construe research on wrongdoing. Social Influence, 11, 230-245.

Newman, L. S., Sapolsky, M. S., Tang, Y., & Bakina, D. A. (2014). What’s recalled depends on the nature of the recall procedure: The case of mnemic neglect. Social Psychology, 45, 93-102.

Newman, L. S., & Bakina, D. A. (2009). Do people resist social-psychological perspectives on wrongdoing? Reactions to dispositional,  situational, and interactionist explanations. Social Influence, 4,  256-273.

Newman, L. S., & Erber, R. (2002). Understanding Genocide: The social psychology of the Holocaust. New York: Oxford University Press.

Newman, L. S., Duff, K. J., & Baumeister, R. F. (1997). A new look at defensive projection: Thought suppression, accessibility, and biased person perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72, 980-1001.