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Past Events

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Colloquia - Hayley Clatterbuck

Sep 21, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

500 Hall of Languages

Colloquia are typically held on Friday afternoons, and are followed by a reception in HL 538.

The speaker for this colloquia will be Hayley Clatterbuck, Assistant Professor, University of Rochester, Title TBA.

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Voces en Exilio

Sep 20, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

LaCasita Cultural Center, 109 Otisco Street, Syracuse

Many have been moved by the number of Puerto Ricans -- including those with Syracuse connections -- whose lives were disrupted by Hurricane María (September, 2017). Although hope abounds that life-as-usual will someday be restored there, many displaced families have no immediate plans to return to Puerto Rico. This story resonates deeply with José “Peppie” Calvar, Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Choral Activities at the Setnor School of Music at Syracuse University, and director of the Hendricks Chapel Choir.

Peppie is a first-generation American of Cuban descent, whose family, under a different set of circumstances, was exiled from its homeland. Calvar's project creates a piece of music for mixed chorus, Afro-Caribbean percussion, and piano to commemorate hurricane victims. The music and text touches on the suffering of the Puerto Rican people and the need to restore critical infrastructure to the island, while also serving as a celebration of the outpouring of support many displaced Puerto Ricans have received from fellow Americans living on the mainland.
 
The all-student Hendricks Chapel Choir performs two public performances as part of their Fall '18 curriculum -- this date at La Casita, and September 23rd as part of the weekly Dean's Convocation in Hendricks Chapel.

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D. Boutt

Sep 20, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2018/2019 Nelson coordinator.

 

 

 

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Testing the Hydrogen Bomb: A Status Report by Emlyn Willard Hughes

Sep 20, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Paul Souder, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

In the 1940s and 1950s, the United States performed 67 nuclear weapon tests in the Marshall Islands, including the detonation of the largest US thermonuclear weapon (15 megatons), named Castle Bravo. Seventy years later, the impact of these tests on the Marshallese people is still apparent. The more recent challenge of rising sea levels, coupled with the remaining nuclear waste represents a particularly chilling problem. In this talk, we will discuss our recent work on this topic, as well as future plans.

 

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Stocks & Finance Immersion Trip Information Session

Sep 18, 2018, 5:30 PM-6:00 PM

205 Hall of Languages

Kristen Aust (kraust@syr.edu 315.443.1447)

This information session provides details on the 2018 Stocks & Finance Immersion Trip, taking place Nov. 11-13. This is a two day trip where students meet with alumni and others working in areas such as banking, finance, private equity and hedge funds. Selected candidates must be of sophomore or junior status and be enrolled at the College of Arts and Sciences or Maxwell. Come to this information session in 205 HL to learn more about how to apply.



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Stephen Morin, Ph.D., University of Nebraska Lincoln

Sep 18, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Zheng

More information about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Dr. Jason Fridley, Biology P&T Seminar

Sep 17, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Doug Frank

TITLE:  TBA

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Race, Religion, and Surveillance in the National Security State

Sep 13, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Slocum 214

Religion Graduate Organization

Dr. Sylvester A. Johnson, Assistant Vice Provost for the Humanities at Virginia Tech will be giving a lecture on September 13th, "Race, Religion, and Surveillance in the National Security State" as part of the RGO Speaker Series. The lecture will address Islam, Christian nationalism, technologies of surveillance, and current practices of racializing religion. It will take place in Slocum 214 at 7:00 pm. The talk is funded by the Graduate Student Organization, sponsored by the Religion Graduate Organization, Cultural Foundations of Education, Communication and Rhetorical Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, and hosted by the Department of Religion at Syracuse University.

 

 

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Alison Frontier, Ph.D., University of Rochester

Sep 11, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Chemistry Graduate Students 

More information about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Dr. Kari Segraves, Biology P&T Seminar

Sep 10, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Mark Ritchie

TITLE:  Cheating, Community Context, and Coevolutions in Species Interactions

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Physics Department Annual Fall Picnic

Sep 9, 2018, 11:00 AM-3:00 PM

Green Lakes State Park, Reserve Shelter

Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

Please join us on Sunday, September 9th, 2018 for the Physics Department Fall Picnic at Green Lakes’ Reserve Shelter. There will be food, there will be games, there will be fun!

*Please note that cleanup is starts at 3 pm. Guests are welcome to stay longer if they so wish. Note that this it is a ‘carry-in carry-out park.

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Miriam Reiss

Sep 6, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2018/2019 Nelson coordinator.

"Seismic anisotropy: how to decipher the earth's interior with shear-wave splitting".

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Lunchtime Lecture: RODIN

Sep 5, 2018, 12:15 PM-1:30 PM

Syracuse University Art Galleries | Shaffer Art Building

Free and Open to the public.

Join Romita Ray, associate professor of art history, for SU Art Galleries' first Lunchtime Lecture of the year! Prof. Ray is sure to give an engaging and illustrious gallery tour of the newly installed exhibition, Rodin: The Human Experience.

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Gonen Ashkenasy, Ph.D., Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Sep 4, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Makhlynets

More information about this week's presenter can be found here

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Chris Junium

Aug 30, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2018/2019 Nelson coordinator.

Solving nitrogen and carbon cycle conundrums: new approaches for accessing high-resolution biogeochemical signals from ancient organic materials.

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Classes Begin

Aug 27, 2018, 7:00 AM-7:00 PM

Campus wide

Classes Begin - Monday, August 27

Syracuse University orientation takes place a few days prior to the start of classes.



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Syracuse Welcome 2018

Aug 23, 2018, 7:00 AM-7:00 PM

Campus wide

New Student Move-in Day 1 - Tuesday, August 21
New Student Move-in Day 2 - Wednesday, August 22
New Student Move-in Day 3 - Thursday, August 23
Syracuse Welcome 2018 - Thursday, August 23-Sunday, August 26

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Elise Hinman - Biology Ph.D. Defense

Aug 16, 2018, 10:00 AM-11:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

ADVISOR:  Dr. Jason Fridley

TITLE:  Survival in the Forest Understory: Resilience and Resistance to Damage in Native and Invasive Woody Plants

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TBD by Michael Czajkowski

Aug 7, 2018, 10:00 AM-11:30 AM

Room: 202 Physics Bldg.

Advisor: Prof. Cristina Marchetti, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

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Haozhi Wang

Aug 2, 2018, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM

room and number

Advisor: Prof. Britton Plourde, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

Superconducting circuits operated at low temperatures have led to rapid advances in quantum information processing as well as quantum optics in the microwave regime. Engineered quantum systems with a dense spectrum of modes coupled to artificial atoms, or qubits, formed from superconducting circuits offer an opportunity to explore largescale entanglement or perform quantum simulations of many-body phenomena. Recent research efforts into artificial metamaterials have yielded microwave and optical systems with numerous counterintuitive properties, including left-handed transmission, where the group velocity and phase velocity for a wave point in opposite directions. Metamaterial resonators implemented with superconducting thin-film circuits provide a route to generating dense mode spectra in the microwave regime for coupling to qubits. In this thesis, we discuss the implementation of such superconducting metamaterial resonators. First, we derive the dispersion relation for one-dimensional metamaterial transmission lines and we describe the formation of resonators from such lines and their quality factors. Next, we describe the design and fabrication of transmission-line metamaterial resonators using superconducting thin films. We characterize the metamaterials through low-temperature microwave measurements as well as Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) images of the microwave field distributions in the circuit. We compare these various measurements with numerical simulations of the microwave properties of the circuits, including simulated current density and charge density distributions for the excitation of different resonance modes. Following the successful realization of dense mode spectra in these circuits, we have initiated the first experiments with a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a metamaterial resonator and we describe our progress in this direction.

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TBD by Adam Patch

Jul 31, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

Room: 202 Physics Bldg.

Advisor: Prof. Cristina Marchetti, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

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Statistical mechanics of thermalized ribbons and sheets by Sourav Bhabesh

Jul 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Mark Bowick/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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TBD by Swetha Bhagwat

Jun 29, 2018, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

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"Visions of America" exhibition on view at the Everson Musuem through August 19

Jun 20, 2018, 12:00 PM-5:00 PM

Everson Museum, 401 Harrison Street, Syracuse NY

Admission: $8 - Adults, $6 - Seniors (65+), Students, FREE - Everson Members, Children 12 and under, Military (w/ ID)

In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Everson building, Visions of America showcases the depth of the Everson’s collection of American art. In 1911, the Everson (then known as the Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts) made history as the first museum in the country to declare that it would collect only work made by American artists, a decision which led to the acquisition of many important works that are today beloved by Everson visitors. This exhibition features many of these visitor favorites, including work by Edward Hicks, Eastman Johnson, Frederick Remington, Adelaide Alsop Robineau, and Gilbert Stuart.

On view May 12--August 19, 2018

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Dan Li - Biology Ph.D. Defense

Jun 12, 2018, 9:30 AM-10:30 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

ADVISOR:  Dr. Ramesh Raina

TITLE:  Characterization of the Roles of Histone Demethylase JMJ14 in Modulating Plant Defense Responses in Arabidopsis

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Yini Li - Biology Ph.D. Defense

May 29, 2018, 9:30 AM-10:30 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

ADVISOR:  Dr. Eleanor Maine

TITLE:  The Balance of Poly(U) Polymerase Activity Ensures Germline Identity, Survival, and Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

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Elizabeth McDonald - Biology Master's Defense

May 23, 2018, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

ADVISOR:  Dr. Susan Parks

TITLE:  Acoustic Detection of Spawning Phenology of Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus)

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Solid-Solid Phase Transitions in Colloidal Matter by Chrisy Xiyu Du

May 17, 2018, 9:00 AM-10:00 AM

Room 208

Host: Lisa Manning (mmanning@syr.edu)

Phase transitions are ubiquitous in nature, and are observed throughout everyday life from the melting of ice to the magnetization of iron. In particular, solid–solid phase transitions are important in many areas such as metallurgy, geosciences, and the design of reconfigurable materials. Following the recent initiative of using nano building blocks to design next generation materials, we answer fundamental questions about solid–solid phase transitions in colloidal matter and guide the design of materials that can change phase. We construct a minimal model of solid–solid phase transitions that are induced by altering particle shape. Using the minimal model, we are able to determine the thermodynamic order of several phase transitions. Under the same construct of the minimal model, we can also design target phase transitions as desired. Our results show viable candidate particles for reconfigurable materials. Moreover, our results give insight into the fundamental of the most common, but most poorly understood phase transitions in nature, and provide new minimal models for understanding solid–solid transitions in atomic systems.

Masters Convocation

May 12, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

Setnor Auditorium, Crouse College

The College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to welcome all participating students, parents and guests to the 2018 Master's Convocation on Saturday, May 12. See the Masters Convocation page for more information. 

Bachelor's Convocation

May 12, 2018, 8:30 AM-10:30 AM

Carrier Dome

The College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to welcome all participating students, parents and guests to the 2018 Bachelor's Convocation on Saturday, May 12, and cordially invites you to join the College of Arts and Sciences' faculty and staff for light refreshments immediately following Convocation. For more information, please see the 2018 Bachelor's Convocation page

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Cosmological Perturbations in the Early Universe by Gizem Sengor

May 11, 2018, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM

Room 208 Physics Building

Advisor: Prof. Scott Watson

A key essence of capturing the history of primordial fluctuations that arise during inflation and eventually lead to formation of large scale structures in the universe on paper, relies on quantizing general relativity coupled to a scalar field. This is a system that respects diffeomorphism invariance, the freedom of choosing the coordinate system to work with without changing the physics. Hence the way to handle its quantization requires a well understanding of how to quantize diffeomorphisms. Deciding on suitable coordinate choices and making sure that this gauge fixing, which is unavoidable in any calculation, does not effect the end result is tricky. In this thesis we make full use of the effects of diffeomorphism invariance of the theory on the primordial fluctuations to pursue two different approaches that focus on treating perturbations after gauge fixing. On one line we work towards developing our understanding of how to handle quantization in terms of Dirac quantization and Becchi, Rouet, Stora, Tyutin (BRST) quantization. On another line we focus on how to generalize the allowed interactions and understand the scales they bring in the era of preheating that follows inflation, with effective field theory methods on cosmological backgrounds

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Dr. Danielle Way, University of Western Ontario

May 7, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Katie Becklin

TITLE:  Contrasting responses of key boreal tree species to climate change  

Supported by WiSE Women Scholar Co-sponsorship Program and Biology Department

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Humanities NY Graduate Public Humanities Fellows Presentations

May 4, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Hugh Burnam (Ph.D. Candidate, Higher Education)
Matthew Stewart (Ph.D. Candidate, History)

This year's New York Public Humanities Graduate Fellows discuss their experiences and challenges of developing public humanities research projects.  More info coming soon -- save the date!

To RSVP, please contact Aimee Germain by April 25; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Observing black holes and neutron stars from across the universe with gravity by Dr. Josh Smith

May 3, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof.Duncan Brown/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960


Gravitational waves, ripples in space-time, provide a view of the universe complimentary, and often completely invisible, to light. In 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) debuted this new ”sense” for humanity by observing gravitational waves from coalescing binary systems of black holes. In 2017, LIGO and Virgo kicked off an era of multimessenger gravitational-wave astronomy by observing a binary neutron star merger and prompting electromagnetic observations across the electromagnetic spectrum. These discoveries have solved the mysterious origins of short gamma-ray bursts, provided new tests of relativity, measurements of the Hubble constant, and insights into black hole and neutron star physics. I will discuss these results and how advances in gravitational-wave observing technology beyond this initial breakthrough will open other frequency bands of the unexplored gravitational-wave spectrum and probe the universe’s structure and history on cosmological scales. 

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Upstate Medical University Pre-Admission Advisement

May 1, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall

College of Medicine

Students interested in the College of Medicine may attend a Medical College Information Session which is held on the First Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am in Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall. Students can register on-line or call the admissions office to register for this session.

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Taking the measure of neutron stars with NICER

Apr 30, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

202 Physics Bldg.

Host: Jack Laiho/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is NASA's new X-ray timing instrument onboard the ISS that was launched in June 2017. With a large effective area, low background, very precise absolute timing and great low energy response, NICER has been doing a fantastic job in observing many interesting phenomena related to neutron stars and black holes. One of the main goals of the NICER mission is to constrain the equation of state of ultra-dense matter by measuring the masses and radii of several rotation-powered millisecond pulsars. This is being done by fitting pulse waveform models that incorporate all relevant relativistic effects and atmospheric radiation transfer processes to the periodic soft X-ray modulations produced by the rotation of hot spots located near the magnetic polar caps of these pulsars. Some of the other interesting topics that are being studied with NICER includes phenomena related to Type I X-ray bursts, which are thermonuclear flashes observed from the surfaces of accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries, such as photospheric radius expansion and burst oscillations. NICER's large effective area and excellent low energy response enable new, detailed studies of these bursts in the soft X-ray band. In this talk I will present some of the early results from the first nine months of the NICER mission and will report on the progress being made by the NICER team in measuring the masses and radii of pulsars.

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Laura Porturas - Biology Master's Defense

Apr 30, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

ADVISOR:  Dr. Kari Segraves

TITLE: The effect of genome duplication on the reproductive ecology of plants

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Colloquia - William Starr

Apr 27, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

500 Hall of Languages

The speaker for this colloquia will be William Starr, Associate Professor, Cornell University, "Norms of Communication".

Anti-Racism in the English Classroom

Apr 27, 2018, 2:30 PM-4:00 PM

Hall of Languages, Room 114

We invite students to a dialogue with faculty to contemplate how the English department can
change the campus climate at SU. We are committed to working to create a University and
Departmental culture that is anti-racist, anti-homophobic, anti-sexist, and anti-ableist. This
listening and dialogue session aims to address three objectives:
Assessment
Recent testimonials at the Hendricks Chapel suggest that the classroom can be a hostile space
for students of color at SU. What experiences and pedagogical encounters speak to the ways in
which students of color are devalued, excluded, or tokenized at SU? How can faculty combat
and transform these pedagogical practices?
Vision
How can students help the English department actualize its commitment toward cultivating an
anti-racist, anti-homophobic, anti-sexist, and anti-ableist campus climate? What texts, values,
and ideas would you like to see emphasized in our courses?
Strategy
What steps can and should the English department take to materialize these visions?
Hosted by the English Department. Coffee, tea, and snacks will be provided.

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TBA Jim Halverson

Apr 27, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Bldg.

Host: Scott Watson/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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TBD by Tim Atherton

Apr 27, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 202/204

Host: Joey Paulsen | Contact: David Yllanes (dyllanes@syr.edu)

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The Joy of Close Reading in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Apr 27, 2018, 9:00 AM-6:15 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

A Conference in Memory of Hope Glidden

Conference presenters include:

  • Philip Usher (NYU) - Keynote
  • Brian Brege (Syracuse University)
  • Jeff Carnes (Syracuse University)
  • Laurinda Dixon (Syracuse University)
  • Samantha Herrick (Syracuse University)
  • Fred Marquardt (Syracuse University)
  • Ahmed Abdel Meguid (Syracuse University)
  • Dennis Romano (Syracuse University)
  • Stephanie Shirilan (Syracuse University)
  • Amanda Winkler (Syracuse University)

Keynote speaker Philip Usher begins the day with "The Life of an Ode," followed by a day of dialogues across departments, as faculty present papers on the practice of close reading of historical sources and literary texts in the context of their research. This event is organized in memory of Professor Hope Glidden who taught early modern French literature at Syracuse University and passed away on Sept. 17, 2017.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

9:00 Breakfast

9:20 Opening Remarks

9:30 Keynote Lecture by Philip Usher (New York University): The Life of an Ode

10:30 Coffee Break

10:45-12:15 First Panel: Reading Disappointment

  • James Watts (Religion): The Disappointments of Close Reading, with an Example from Leviticus 12
  • Jeff Carnes (LLL, Classics): Narcissus in Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • Ahmed Meguid (Religion): The Paradox of Reading Islamic Philosophy: The Discontents of Philology

1:00-2:30 Second Panel: Reading Performance

  • Amanda Winkler (Art & Music History): Singing Devils; or, the Trouble with Trapdoors: History, Performance, and Practicality in Staging the Restoration Tempest
  • Stephanie Shirilan (English and Textual Studies): Sympathetic Breathing in King Lear
  • Laurinda Dixon (Art & Music History): The Mechanics of Mirth: A Close look at laughter in the Renaissance

2:30-2:45 Coffee Break

2:45-4:15 Third Panel: Reading Power

  • Dennis Romano (History): Popular Protest and Alternative Visions of the Venetian Polity, c.1260 to 1423
  • Fred Marquardt (History): How was Christ’s Crucifixion Relevant to Serfdom in the German Peasants’ War of 1525?
  • Brian Brege (History): Spiced Scholarship: Filippo Sassetti and the Quest for True Cinnamon

4:15- 4:30 Coffee Break

4:30-5:30 Fourth Panel: Reading the Other World

  • Samantha Herrick (History): Mystery Saints
  • Stefano Selenu (LLL, Italian): Dante, t.b.d.
  • 5:30-5:45 Closing Remarks, reception follows

Please contact Albrecht Diem (315-443-0785) by April 15 with any requests for accessibility accommodations.


OTHER CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES:

April 13
9 a.m. - Noon - Tribute to Hope Glidden
9 a.m. - 5 p.m - 1st Annual French Colloquium
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons; Bird Library, Room 114
Features an address by former student of Glidden's, Benjamin Peak, PhD student in French Medieval studies at John Hopkins University.
Contact Valentin Duquet for information.

April 25
12:45 - 2 p.m. - Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library
Timothy Kircher (Guilford College)
Building Knowledge in the Renaissance: Humanist Constructs and Conversations
Contact Stefano Selenu for information.


Additional Supporters:

  • Medieval and Renaissance Program
  • Humanities Center
  • College of Arts and Science
  • Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics
  • Department of History

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2018 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award Recipients

Apr 26, 2018, 12:30 PM-5:00 PM

Congratulations!

Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics are proud to share our 2018 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award Recipents!

Valentin Duquet                        Emily Grenz                             David Forteguerre 

Be sure to congratulate them!

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Dr. Joseph Fetcho, Dept. of Neurobiology & Behavior, Cornell University

Apr 26, 2018, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  BGSO and Biology

TITLE:  Principles of assembly and function of neuronal circuits in the hindbrain

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2018 Jack and Pat Bryan Distinguished Lecture - Dr. Joseph Fetcho

Apr 25, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

001 Life Sciences Complex

HOST:  BGSO and Biology

TITLE:  Transparent vertebrates offer a direct view of the brain and spinal cord in action

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Julie Otsuka Reading

Apr 25, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Julie Otsuka is a recipient of the PEN/Faulker Award, the Asian American Literary Award, the American Library Association Alex Award, France's Prix Femina Etranger, and Arts and Letters Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is also the Spring 2018 Don MacNaughton Reader in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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Julie Otsuka in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Apr 25, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Otsuka is the Spring 2018 Don MacNaughton Reader in the College of Arts and Sciences.   

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau

Apr 25, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

105 Life Science Building

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions combines short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

This final gathering in the series features Colleen Kattau on Latin American music and activism. All are welcome.

Additional supporters:

  1.     Art and Music Histories
  2.     Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.     Women’s and Gender Studies

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Building Knowledge in the Renaissance: Humanist Constructs and Conversations

Apr 25, 2018, 12:45 PM-2:00 PM

Hillyer Room, 606 Bird Library

Timothy Kircher (Guilford College)

This public lecture features a pop-up exhibit of selected Italian manuscripts and rare materials preserved in the Ranke Collection at SU Special Collections Research Center. (Display open until 3 p.m.)

Professor Kircher's talk examines how fifteenth- and sixteenth-century humanists explored various pathways to knowledge. To what extent did Renaissance thinkers establish new methods of learning in the studia humanitatis? Kircher sheds light on the current debate over the relation between the humanities and the sciences, in addition to revealing new features of Renaissance civilization (Kultur) since its formulation by Jacob Burckhardt, the foremost student of Leopold von Ranke.

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Jason Herr, Ph.D., Albany Molecular Research Inc.

Apr 24, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Totah

More information about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Digital Humanities Research Symposium

Apr 24, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:00 PM

Schine Student Center Room 304

This inaugural event, open to the SU campus community will showcase students' work across a wide range of disciplines. The projects highlighted are taken from engaging classes in African American Studies, Art Histories and Music Histories, English, Creative Writing, and a myriad of other humanities and social sciences disciplines that use digital humanities technology such as Google Fusion Tables, Omeka, Python, Voyant, Wordpress, to name only a few. The purpose of the showcase is to engage our SU community in fascinating Digital Humanities research at the undergraduate and graduate levels and to feature faculty members that are assigning innovative assignments in their courses.

Co-organized by Dr. Sarah Fuchs Sampson, Dr. Casarae Gibson, and Dr. Meina Yates-Richard.

Co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies, the Department of Art & Music Histories, the Department of English, the Digital Humanities Faculty Working Group, and the College of Arts & Sciences.

For more information, contact dh.symposium.syr@gmail.com

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Asmarina

Apr 23, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Watson Theater, Watson Hall

Asmarina is a documentary that depicts the presence of the habesha community in the city of Milan through collective memories recorded in personal archives. Through photograph, music and stories the film uses voice and image to bring to light a postcolonial heritage that has been little scrutinized up to now. Filmmaker Medhin Paolos is also a photographer, musician and activist. She holds a BFA from NABA - Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti Milan, Italy and is currently an Associate in Latino Studies at Harvard University’s Dept. of Romance Languages and Literatures where she is working on a digital archive project that recovers and preserves stories of immigrants and their descendants.  Download the PDF for more details.

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Asmarina

Apr 23, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:00 PM

Watson Theater, Watson Hall

Film Screening and Q & A of the film Asmarina

Asmarina is a documentary that depicts the presence of the habesha community in the city of Milan through collective memories recorded in personal archives. Through photoraph, music and stories the film uses voice and image to bring to light a postcolonial heritage that has been little scrutinized up to now. Filmmaker Medhin Paolos is also a photographer, musician and activist. She holds a BFA from NABA- Nuova Accademia de Belle Arti Milan, Italy and is currently an Associate in Latino Studies at Harvard University's Dept. of Romance Languages and Literatures where she is working on a digital archive project that recovers and preserves stories of immigrants and their descendants. Please join us for a Q & A with the filmmaker Medhin Paolos & Lorgia Garcia Pena after the screening.

Co-Sponsors: Depts. of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Sociology, Women's & Gender Studies, African American Studies, and LGBT Studies Program.

This film screening is free and open to the public.

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Dr. Tyler Kartzinel

Apr 23, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Douglas Frank

TITLE:  Illuminating and conserving complex food webs in the genomics age

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REAL Talks: Rape Culture

Apr 20, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Sharon Haines Jacquet Education Commons, Huntington Hall

In a political climate that continues to encourage exclusionary rhetoric and practices, university communities have to grapple with what it means to be truly committed to creating spaces of inclusion and belonging. The nation’s reckoning (or lack thereof) with racial and gendered violence, economic crisis, exclusionary immigration and foreign policies, and social unrest has directly affected university communities, while raising questions about the responsibilities institutions of higher education have in these issues.

Three "Resisting Exclusion through Activism and Leadership" sessions -- or "REAL Talks" -- are scheduled for February, March, and April (locatons vary), each addressing a different theme:

  • State Violence (February 9), moderated by Biko Mandela Gray, to include topics of policing, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, immigration control, and DACA
  • Economic Injustice (March 2), moderated by Susan Thomas, covering economic matters affecting the student body including student debt, tuition hikes, the GOP tax bill, and the overall neoliberalization of higher education
  • Rape Culture (April 20), moderated by Chris Eng, discussing the prevalence of rape, assault, and harassment on campuses, the significance of the #metoo movement and the Title IX crisis

These lunchtime dialogues are organized and moderated by faculty organizers from Cultural Foundations of Education, Religious Studies, and English with input from existing SU student organizations working to addressing these specific forms of exclusion. Download the printable/sharable poster.

Due to limited seating, please RSVP to Susan Thomas by April 12; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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Healing Ecology: A Buddhist Perspective on the Eco-Crisis

Apr 20, 2018, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Author, professor, and Zen teacher David Loy leads a small-group discussion based on ideas covered in his public talk on April 19th. Without a better understanding of the ways in which we belong to and depend on the earth, and greater awareness of other ways of dwelling on it, it is likely that our now-global civilization will remain unable to respond adequately to this new challenge.  Rather than thinking of belonging in dualistic terms—who belongs and who does not belong—Loy offers a nondualistic approach to understanding belonging and living.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Bonnie Shoultz (315-492-6341) by April 3 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

BIOGRAPHY: David Loy is a professor of Buddhist and comparative philosophy, receiving degrees from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and a Ph.D. from the National University of Singapore. His dissertation was published by Yale University Press as Nonduality: A Study in Comparative Philosophy. Since 1978, he has taught at a number of universities in East Asia, South Africa, the Netherlands, Canada, and the US.  He is the author of several books, most recently A New Buddhist Path: Enlightenment, Evolution and Ethics in the Modern World (Wisdom Publications, 2015). In 2014 Carleton College awarded him an honorary degree for his contributions to the study and practice of Buddhism in the modern world.


Additional supporters:

  1. Hendricks Chapel
  2. Contemplative Collaborative
  3. Religion Department
  4. Student Buddhist Association
  5. Zen Center of Syracuse

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Does the Earth Belong to Us, or Do We Belong to the Earth? Buddhism and the Ecological Challenge

Apr 19, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

David Loy (Boulder, CO)

Professor, writer, and Zen teacher Loy highlights how Buddhist teachings can bring about a better understanding of the ways in which we belong to and depend on the earth. Without a radical rethinking, it is likely that our now-global civilization will remain unable to respond adequately to this new challenge.  

BIOGRAPHY: David Loy is a professor of Buddhist and comparative philosophy, receiving degrees from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and a Ph.D. from the National University of Singapore. His dissertation was published by Yale University Press as Nonduality: A Study in Comparative Philosophy. Since 1978, he has taught at a number of universities in East Asia, South Africa, the Netherlands, Canada, and the US.  He is the author of several books, most recently A New Buddhist Path: Enlightenment, Evolution and Ethics in the Modern World (Wisdom Publications, 2015). In 2014 Carleton College awarded him an honorary degree for his contributions to the study and practice of Buddhism in the modern world.


Additional supporters:

  1. Hendricks Chapel
  2. Contemplative Collaborative
  3. Religion Department
  4. Student Buddhist Association
  5. Zen Center of Syracuse

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TBD by Sarah M. Milkovich

Apr 19, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Steven Blusk/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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Workshop with Palestinian Filmmaker, Mai Masri

Apr 19, 2018, 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Kittredge Auditorium

Following a public screening of her film, 3000 Nights on April 18, Palestinian director Mai Masri conduct a workshop on the humanities-focused approach she brings to her work, addressing issues of incarceration, gender representations in Arab filmmaking, and others.

Democratizing Knowledge hosts Masri's visit, whose areas of focus directly relate to the content of several Syracuse University spring courses in Middle Eastern Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, English, TV, Radio and Magazine.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Carol Fadda by April 11 and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


Co-Sponsors include: Depts. of English, History, Middle Eastern Studies, Sociology, Transmedia (VPA), Women’s & Gender Studies, Writing Studies, Rhetoric & Composition, the Newhouse School, and the Humanities Center.

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3000 Nights

Apr 18, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Democratizing Knowledge

Inspired by true events, 3000 Nights tells the story of a newlywed Palestinian schoolteacher who is falsely arrested and incarcerated in an Israeli prison where she gives birth to her son. Through her struggle to raise her child behind bars, the film traces her journey of hope, resilience and survival against all odds. Mai Masri is an award-winning filmmaker who studied film at UC Berkeley and San Francisco State University. She directed and produced several documentaries that were screened worldwide and won over 80 international awards. 3000 Nights, her first narrative feature film, premiered at Toronto International Film Festival and won over 24 international awards.  Download the PDF for more details.

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Screening of 3000 Nights by Mai Masri

Apr 18, 2018, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

time and location T.B.A.

Mai Masri is one of the first Palestinian female documentary makers, with several acclaimed documentaries to her name.  Her first feature film, 3000 Nights, was recently released to wide critical acclaim. The film brings a humanities-focused approach to issues of human rights, Palestinian women’s experiences of incarceration, and gender representations in Arab films, amongst others.

Democratcizing Knowledge hosts Masri's visit to campus for this free public screening and Q&A, with a workshop for students and interested faculty the following day.


Additional supporters:

English
Television, Radio and Magazine (Newhouse)

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3rd Annual Books in the Humanities Reception

Apr 17, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Save the date, and check back as details develop for the Humanities Center's annual celebration of Syracuse University authors (copyright 2017)!

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Kevin Kittilstved, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts

Apr 17, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Zheng

More information about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Invitation to Apply - Goldberg Fellowship in French

Apr 16, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:00 PM

Apply by April 16th

The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics and the French Program invite applications for the Gloria L. Goldberg Fellowship.

 The Gloria L. Goldberg Fellowship in French provides a stipend to a student of French language to cover the costs of summer travel to France to learn or improve her/his French language skills. The stipend ($2,000+) is awarded to a student whose first language is not French, for use on a travel abroad experience in France that shall enhance the student’s language skill in French and knowledge of French culture.  Preference shall be given to students who plan to teach French at the high school level after graduation.  Such travel activities may include, but are not limited to, living with a family, participating in a hostel experience, attending a French immersion program, visiting French museums and other landmarks, and participating in courses at French institutions. Dr. Joshua Goldberg was very proud of his wife’s achievements as a French teacher, and he recounted that she attributed her excellent pronunciation to her frequent travels in France.

Applicants should submit a personal statement; a current transcript; and a current résumé. The personal statement should describe the student and her/his achievements in studying French; previous experience, if any, in travel and study abroad; and future career plans.

Complete applications are due no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, April 16, 2017.  Please bring or e-mail application materials to Mrs. Colleen Kepler, cdkepler@syr.edu, 340 H.B. Crouse Hall, 315-443-2175.

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The Fated Sky: Climate, Weather and the Environment in Early Modern England

Apr 16, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

151 Eggers Hall

Sophie Chiari (Clermont Auvergne University, France)

If eco-critical approaches to literary texts receive more and more attention, climate-related issues remain neglected in the field of drama studies. Taking Shakespeare as its starting point, this discussion will focus upon these issues. In particular, it will address the ways that popular and religious beliefs still shaped human relations to meteorological phenomena. Yet, at the same time, a growing number of literati promoted free will rather than determinism and insisted on human ability to act upon celestial forces.

In his plays, Shakespeare tries to reconcile the scientific approaches of his time with more popular ones rooted in superstition and, above all, he promotes a sensitive and pragmatic understanding of meteorological events. The seminar will thus explore the interaction between scientific and popular cultures, the way climatic phenomena could be dealt with on stage and, ultimately, the complex, kaleidoscopic vision of the playwright on the subject. Chiari examines the significance of such a literary and historical investigation of climate to our own pressing concerns about climate change and ecological crisis.


Additional supporters:

  1. English
  2. History
  3. Medieval and Renaissance Working Group
  4. Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

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Dr. Robert Silver

Apr 16, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Syracuse University Biology Department

TITLE:  TBA

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2018 Meeting of the Eastern International Region of the American Academy of Religion

Apr 14, 2018, 8:00 AM-8:00 PM

501 Hall of Languages

Dr. James W. Watts / jwwatts@syr.edu

The 2018 Meeting will be held at Syracuse University, Saturday-Sunday, April 14–15. Conference theme and call for papers will be available later in the fall. Eastern International Region of the American Academy of Religion / www.eiraar.net.

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Naming What is Left Behind

Apr 13, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Jason Shinder Theater, YMCA Downtown Writers Center, 340 Montgomery Street

Sean Thomas Dougherty
Christine Kitano

Acclaimed poets Christine Kitano and Sean Thomas Dougherty read new poems addressing "Belonging" through themes such as immigrant experience, incarceration, economic disenfranchisement, illness, and violence.  This free public event is hosted by the YMCA Downtown Writers Center, thanks in part to a Community Partnership Grant from Humanities New York.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”

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Longing and Belonging: A Conversation on Poetics

Apr 13, 2018, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Christine Kitano
Sean Thomas Dougherty

The YMCA Downtown Writers Center hosts this mini-seminar prior to an evening of readings featuring acclaimed poets, Kitano and Dougherty.  Each discusses how community -- and the lack of, or a yearning for community -- informs the practice of creating poems. Both writers have published important works that address this year’s Symposium theme of "Belonging."  This session is specifically targeted at serious writers and writing teachers; invited guests include advanced adult writing students from the Downtown Writers Center, creative writing MFA students from the University, and faculty members from both programs.

Space is limited: please RSVP by April 6 to Phil Memmer, 315-474-6851 (ext. 328) and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

This collaboration was made possible through a Community Partnership Grant from Humanities New York.



CHRISTINE KITANO is the author of Sky Country (BOA Editions, Fall 2017) and Birds of Paradise (Lynx House Press, 2011). She received her BA from the University of California, her MFA from Syracuse University, and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Texas Tech University. She was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA, and currently lives in Ithaca, NY, where she is an assistant professor of creative writing, poetry, and Asian American literature at Ithaca College.

Kitano’s Sky Country explores the various ways we negotiate how we belong in this world, how we make space in unwelcome spaces. The collection’s title is a translation of the Korean word for “heaven,” a kenning that literally means “sky country.” It was a word that potential immigrants often used to describe America. Once they arrived, of course, they often found America less than the ideal paradise they imagined. The poems throughout the collection explore how the idea of “home” becomes idealized through a nostalgic longing for a homeland that no longer (or never) exists, and what it means to survive between worlds.

SEAN THOMAS DOUGHERTY is the author of twelve books of poetry, including three from BOA Editions: Broken Hallelujahs (2007), Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line (2010); and All You Ask For Is Longing: New & Selected Poems (2014). His awards include a Fulbright Lectureship in the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships in Poetry. Dougherty received his MFA from Syracuse University and reads and conducts workshops around the country. His newest book is The Second O of Sorrow.

Writing about his own work, Dougherty says, “The difference between longing and belonging might describe what I've been trying to answer in my poems for decades.  Is belonging ever really possible?  Are we all outsiders, Auslanders, until someone opens a door, a border, a heart? Perhaps it is the poem itself that is an expression of belonging?  My new book, The Second O of Sorrow, deals extensively with a person’s struggle to still belong to a community despite racial or economic disenfranchisement, despite illness and pain, to hold on against the fragmentation of a community, or a family. To belong to a place, perhaps someplace simple as a bar, or a park where teenagers do not shoot each other, or a block where one can walk, despite fear, a place where the poem can speak:  to stand hand in hand is to fight with a collective voice.  A chorus, a chord, towards a collective healing.”

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Our History Our Legacy: The Construction of Collective Identities

Apr 13, 2018, 9:50 AM-5:00 PM

Dr. Paul and Natalie Strasser Legacy Room, 220 Eggers Hall

Chronos, Syracuse University’s Undergraduate History Journal, will be hosting its second-annual Undergraduate History Conference on Friday, April 13, 2018 in the Strasser Legacy Room, 220 Eggers Hall. Beginning at 9:50 AM with opening remarks by Maxwell Associate Dean and Professor of Sociology Andrew London, the Conference will feature presentations from a wide range of Maxwell faculty as well as graduating honors history students. Throughout the day, faculty will present short lectures based on their research as it connects to the central theme of the Conference: “Our History, Our Legacy: The Construction of Collective Identities.” Visit the Chronos website for the schedule and more information.

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21st French Colloquium

Apr 13, 2018, 9:30 AM-5:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons- Room 114 - Bird Library

The 21stAnnual French Colloquium- In Memory of Hope Glidden

9:30-10:00 Breakfast

10:00-10:15 Opening Words and Stefano Giannini’s remarks

10:15-10:40 Barbara Opar

10:40-11:05 Ninon Bartz

11:05-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-11:40 Meggan Girardin

11:40-12:00 Grace Hildreth

12:00-12:30 Nicole Wallenbrock

12:30-1:30 Lunch Break

1:30-2:00 Benjamin Peak

2:10-3:20 The Round Table

3:20-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-4:00 Pi Delta Phi Honor Society Induction Ceremony

4:05-5:45 Film Screening – Les Stances à Sophie

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CRISIS: A Visual Exploration of Conflict (Gallery Reception and Exhibit)

Apr 12, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

SU Art Galleries

All are invited to an opening reception celebrating this student curated exhibition. ​CRISIS: A Visual Exploration of Conflict​,​ examines how artists have captured and reacted to physical conflicts, issues of identity, and the changing conceptual methodologies in art itself. Drawing from campus collections, the show will include examples of prints, photographs, archival materials, paintings, and multi-dimensional objects, covering a broad range of historical events, social issues, and artistic styles.

The exhibit runs April 5 - May 13.

Additional supporters:
Light Work
Special Collections and Research Center

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Greg Henkes (Stony Brook)

Apr 12, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2017/2018 K.D. Nelson coordinator.

The temperature and oxygen isotope evolution of Phanerozoic seawater from carbonate clumped isotopes

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Colleen Kattau on the Latin American New Song Movement

Apr 12, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Colleen Kattau (SUNY Corland)

Singer, songwriter, and SUNY Cortland Associate Professor of Spanish, Colleen Kattau, presents a lecture and performance on the Latin American New Song movement.

Space is limited; please RSVP to Gail Bulman by April 2. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

This free, public session is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, [SPA 400] Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

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Damon and Jo come to SU

Apr 11, 2018, 7:30 PM-9:00 PM

Gifford Auditorium, H.B.C.

Please join us and meet Damon Dominique and Joanna Franco who make up “Damon and Jo” a popular YouTube Channel, with over 900,000 subscribers and more than a million views each month, tailored towards young people who would like to travel but may have a limited budget, or who lack familiarity with a particular destination.

 “We’re Damon and Jo – two 90s kids who got tired of cheesy travel shows and cookie-cutter travel hosts, so we took off around the world and made a travel show for the social media generation: Shut Up and Go. We post videos 4x a week in English, Portuguese, French, and when we're feelin' lucky, Spanish, German, and Italian.”

Damon and Jo are two internet celebrities who are best friends; they are both in their mid-twenties, and each has unique qualities. Damon is a college dropout who grew up in a trailer park in Indiana, and Jo is a fun-loving Brazilian woman with a business degree. Together they make up “Damon and Jo”, a team who keep their

audience laughing while recounting all their trials and tribulations as they explore a variety of countries and situations.

Please join “La Societe Francophone and the Department of Languages Literatures and Linguistics” where our guests will talk to students about the role of language, travel, and global awareness in education, and about the story of their business, http://www.shutupandgo.travel

 Damon and Jo’s corporate sponsors include Toyota, Starbucks, MTV, Target, ATT, Greyhound and numerous others.

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B.G. Rudolph Lecture in Jewish Studies

Apr 11, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Location: TBD

More information to come.

Contact: Zachary Braiterman

“The Narrative Powers of Women & The Failure of Cultural Translation: Alexandria in the Literary Memory of the Rabbis”

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Gendered Mobilization, Body Politics and Change in the Middle East

Apr 11, 2018, 12:00 PM-12:00 PM

time and location T.B.D.

Nadje Al-Ali (SOAS University of London)

Al-Ali’s talk looks comparatively at women’s mobilization and feminist activism in Iraq, Egypt and Turkey and the Kurdish movement. Drawing upon contemporary events from a feminist perspective engages a range of disciplines. In addition to her scholarship on women, gender, and feminism in the Middle East, Al-Ali is a founding member of Act Together: Women’s Action for Iraq. Her books are frequently used in undergraduate teaching, appreciated for their ethnographic detail and clarity.

BIOGRAPHY: Al-Ali is Chair of the Centre of Gender Studies, SOAS, and the author of Secularism, Gender and the State in the Middle East: the Egyptian Women’s Movement; Iraqi Women: Untold Stories from 1948 to the Present; and with Nicola Pratt What Kind of Liberation? Women and the Occupation in Iraq.


Additional supporters:

  • Women's & Gender Studies
  • Middle Eastern Studies

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Robert A. DiStasio Jr., Ph.D., Cornell University

Apr 10, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Franck

More information about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Dr. Joseph Warren-Stony Brook University

Apr 9, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Susan Parks

TITLE:  Using bioacoustics to study aquatic ecosystems: from blue whales to water fleas

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Habits of Reading, Habits of Sympathy

Apr 6, 2018, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

T.B.A.

Melissa Shields Jenkins (Wake Forest University)

This public talk is part of a two-day workshopping event in which members of the Syracuse Department of English and the 19th Century Studies Working Group of the Mellon Humanities Corridor come together to share ideas and new work within the disciplines.  Professor Shields Jenkins' presentation draws from a book manuscript about sympathy, race, and social class. She analyzes the proliferation of “recommended reading” book lists in the early twentieth century, discussing how the first gestures towards Victorian canon formation affect how we design syllabi, construct and arrange critical arguments, and interpret texts.


Additional supporters:
English
Syracuse University Libraries

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Seizing the Means of Publication: Zine Making

Apr 6, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 002, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Barnard College Library)

Freedman focuses on how library work -- beyond its supportive role in higher education -- can also stand separate from enabling student learning and faculty research.  

RSVP to Patrick Williams (315-443-9520) by April 1; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.


BIOGRAPHY: Jenna Freedman is a zine librarian and creator, currently serving as Associate Director of Communications at the Barnard Library in NYC. She has published articles on zine librarianship and presented around the United States and in France on the topic, as well as on other themes of library activism. Jenna is a co-founder of Radical Reference and #critlib.


Additional supporters:

  1. Syracuse University Libraries
  2. School of Information Studies
  3. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

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Fourth Annual Neuroscience Research Day

Apr 6, 2018, 8:30 AM-3:45 PM

Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center

Fourth Annual Neuroscience Research Day will be held on April 6, 2018 at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center.

Keynote speaker Ken Pugh, PhD comes to us from Yale University’s Haskins Laboratory where they focus on the science of the spoken and written word. He will be speaking on the topic of “The Neurobiology of Reading and Reading Disability”.

Registration is now open! Register and submit your abstract for poster presentations – due March 23rd. Faculty, students (grad and undergrad) and research staff: present a new poster or your most recent poster from a local, national or international meeting.

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Zine Librarianship as Critical Practice

Apr 5, 2018, 5:15 PM-6:30 PM

Peter Graham Room 114, Bird Library

Jenna Freedman (Barnard College Library)

In this public lecture, Freedman shows how library work, while frequently -- and accurately -- viewed as a support role in higher education, can also stand separate from enabling student learning and faculty research. Librarians and other library staff are doing important work that does not rely on curriculum or administrative decree through collecting materials such as zines, by performing their roles with empathy and a critical eye, and by creating safe spaces.


BIOGRAPHY: Jenna Freedman is a zine librarian and creator, currently serving as Associate Director of Communications at the Barnard Library in NYC. She has published articles on zine librarianship and presented around the United States and in France on the topic, as well as on other themes of library activism. Jenna is a co-founder of Radical Reference and #critlib.


Additional supporters:

  1. Syracuse University Libraries
  2. School of Information Studies
  3. Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition

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Robert Darling (SUNY Cortland)

Apr 5, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2017/2018 K.D. Nelson coordinator.

 Cristobalite, Stretched Quartz, and Melt Inclusions in Adirondack Garnet

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Reimagining a Feminist Poetics with Aurora Luque and Sara Torres

Apr 4, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Grewen Auditorium, Le Moyne College

Poets Sara Torres and Aurora Luque present a bi-lingual poetry recital (Spanish/English) with cellist accompaniment by Pamela Davenport. Representing two generations, their works deal with concepts of tradition, innovation, and feminist voices.

This public performance complements a lecture and roundtable discussion, “Herencia poetica feminista en España” (conducted in Spanish, April 3rd) between the visiting poets and faculty, staff, and students from both Le Moyne College and Syracuse University.


Additional supporters:

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Languages, LIteratures & Linguistics
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Central New York Humanities Corridor (LLC13 working group)
  • LeMoyne College Department of Modern Languages

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Yiyun Li Reading

Apr 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Yiyun Li is the 2018 Richard Elman Visiting Writer in the College of Arts and Sciences. She teaches at Princeton University and was selected by Granta as one of the 21 Best Young American Novelists under 35 and was named by The New Yorker as one of the top 20 writers under 40.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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Yiyun Li in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Apr 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Yiyun teaches at Princeton University. She is the 2018 Richard Elman Visiting Writer in the College of Arts and Sciences.  

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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Marcello Forconi, Ph.D., College of Charleston

Apr 3, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Korendovych

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Upstate Medical University Pre-Admission Advisement

Apr 3, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall

College of Medicine

Students interested in the College of Medicine may attend a Medical College Information Session which is held on the First Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am in Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall. Students can register on-line or call the admissions office to register for this session.

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Dr. Priscilla van Wynsberghe - Colgate University

Apr 2, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Sarah Hall

TITLE:  Understanding circadian rhythm proteins in C. elegans

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New Islamist Architecture and Urbanism: Negotiating Nation and Islam through Built Environment in Turkey

Mar 30, 2018, 3:00 PM-4:30 PM

Eggers 060, reception to follow in Maxwell Atrium

New Islamist Architecture and Urbanism: Negotiating Nation and Islam through Built Environment in Turkey 

Bülent Batuman (Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey and Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Pennsylvania State University)

In this public presentation (preceded by daytime workshops), Batuman provides an overview of his new book, New Islamist Architecture and Urbanism, which claims that, in today’s world, a research agenda concerning the relation between Islam and space has to consider the role of Islamism rather than Islam in shaping – and in return being shaped by – the built environment. Defining Turkey’s transformation in the past two decades as a process of “new Islamist” nation-(re)building, the book investigates the role of built environment in the making of an Islamist milieu.

Drawing on political economy and cultural studies, this talk explores the prevailing primacy of nation and nationalism for new Islamism and the spatial negotiations between nation and Islam. It discusses the role of architecture in the deployment of history in the rewriting of nationhood and that of space in the expansion of Islamist social networks and cultural practices. Looking at examples of housing compounds, mosques, public spaces and the new presidential residence, the talk scrutinizes the spatial making of new Islamism in Turkey through comparisons with relevant cases across the globe: urban renewal projects in Beirut and Amman, nativization of Soviet modernism in Baku and Astana, the presidential palaces of Ashgabat and Putrajaya and the neo-Ottoman mosques built in diverse locations as Tokyo and Washington DC.

DAYTIME CONFERENCE:
De/constructing the Middle Eastern City: Places, Publics, and Geographies of Global Connection
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
at Eggers 341
The day begins with breakout sessions with scholars from Syracuse University and visitors from Cornell, Colgate, and Binghamton. Download the Call for Participants and Abstracts, due February 19. Conference schedule will be finalized on February 26.

RSVP to Natalie Koch by February 19; to particpate in any of the 9am-3pm sessions. Please include any request for accessibility accommodations.


Additional supporters:

  • Department of Geography
  • Middle Eastern Studies Program
  • Moynihan Institute

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The Poetics of Confinement: A Workshop

Mar 30, 2018, 12:00 PM-2:00 PM

Lemke Seminar Room, SCRC, 6th floor, Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)
Stephen Kuusisto (SU - Cultural Foundations of Education)

Drawing on the rich archival resources of the Special Collections Research Center, Susan Schweik and SU writer and professor Stephen Kuusisto lead a workshop featuring poetry that takes up or riffs off of archives of confinement and eugenic ideologies. Engaging work by Cecil Giscombe on the Tribe of Ishmael (who were once displayed by eugenicists as "America's Worst Family"), the Blunt Research Group's highly experimental The Work-Shy, and Molly McCully Brown's The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and the Feebleminded, participants will explore how poets contest various states of confinement and incarceration, and perhaps try their hands themselves.

Space is limited; please RSVP by 3/23/18 to baferri@syr.edu, include any accommodations requests.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series, with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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The Invention of the Muslim World and Islamophobia

Mar 30, 2018, 10:00 AM-12:30 PM

204 Maxwell

Cemil Aydin (University of North Carolina)
Deepa Kumar (Rutgers University)
Osamah Khalil (Syracuse University)

Aydin and Kumar present from their recent works, followed by dialogue moderated by Khalil.

This event rounds out a two-part Middle Eastern Studies Spring Symposium, The Politics of Gender, Islam, and Islamophobia.

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Disability Justice in the Archives

Mar 29, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

Examining the history of Carrie Buck (of the infamous 1927 Supreme Court decision, Buck v. Bell), Schweik highlights contested issues related to re/presenting Carrie Buck and her life as a so-called feebleminded woman. From Oliver Wendell Holmes’ notorious decree that “Three generations of imbeciles are enough,” to trans-disability representations in the made-for-TV movie starring Marlee Matlin, a Deaf actor, to recent performances of Buck by transgender actors, Buck has proven a more malleable figure than essentialist understandings might suggest. Beginning with the politics and ethics of remembering Buck, Schweik explores some archives made and curated by people who were subjected to institutionalization in the first half of the twentieth century. How do we read and find these “impermanent records?"

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series, with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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Morgan Schaller (Rensselaer Polytechnic)

Mar 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2017/2018 K.D. Nelson coordinator.

 Soil carbonate-hosted fluid inclusions: New constraints on the major gas composition of the ancient atmosphere.

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Two Tales of Exo-Planets: Atmospheric Evaporation and The Astrobiology of the Anthropocene by Adam Frank

Mar 29, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Peter Saulson/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

In this two-part talk I present results from our group studying exoplanets as physical systems as well as using them to consider future evolutionary pathways for human civilization on a climate-changed world.  In the first part of the talk I will report on results using Adaptive Mesh Refinement radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study exoplanet “winds” created by photoionization from the parent star.  Such mass loss can dramatically change a planet’s atmospheric evolution.  

In the second part of the talk I will introduce new work on "The Astrobiology of the Anthropocene” where we develop models showing climate change to be the likely generic outcome of an exo-civilization's co-evolution with it’s home planet.  We show how this “astrobiological perspective” might inform current debates about the long term viability of a civilization like our own.

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35th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Public Affairs Lecture

Mar 28, 2018, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Sharon A. Brangman, MD, Distinguished Service Professor and Chief of Geriatrics at SUNY Upstate Medical University will be presenting "Doorway Thoughts: Crossing the Threshold to Cultural Competence"

Dr. Brangman, SU ’77, is Director of the SUNY Upstate Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease. She is past president of the American Geriatrics Society. Her research on multicultural clinical issues and geriatrics appears in such publications as Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, American Family Physician, and American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias. Her success in navigating discrimination in medicine is featured in Triple Triumph: Three Women in Medicine.

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Performance-Discussion Series: Music & Activism

Mar 28, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

114 Bird Library - Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Sydney Hutchinson, sjhutchi@syr.edu

Free and Open to the Public.

WHAT CAN MUSIC DO?  This series pairs SU students with CNY artists to explore answers to this question. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, the musicians in the series draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific genres from hiphop and spoken word to nueva canción and US folk music in their quest to improve our world.

1. African American music and activism: Vanessa Johnson and World Be Free (1/31)

2. Spoken word and activism: Signature Soul (2/28)

3. Musical theater and activism: Dream Freedom Resistance (3/28)

4.  Latin American music and activism: Colleen Kattau (4/25)

Wednesdays 1/31, 2/28, 3/28, 4/25   2:30-3:30 PM   Peter Grant Scholarly Commons (1/31, 2/28, 3/28), LSB 105 (4/25) 

Sponsored by SU Humanities Center, Art & Music Histories, Latino/Latin American Studies, Women & Gender Studies

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Here the Diaries End: Intellectual Disability and the Ends of Life Writing

Mar 27, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

Accounts of published representations of people with Down Syndrome, authored by people with Down Syndrome, usually start, wrongly, in the 1990s. However, scholars and activists at Syracuse University knew better: Douglas Biklen, Chris Kleiwer and Burton Blatt all wrote about the diaries of Paul Scott (published, with heavy editorial framing, in 1965). Schweik draws on Blatt’s A Basic Kit to Confront the Human Disposal Authority to re-read the final section of Scott’s diaries as protest literature and prison writing.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:
  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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Julia Koeppe, Ph.D., SUNY Oswego

Mar 27, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Makhlynets

More information about this week's speaker can be found here.

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Reproduction Justice & Our Communities

Mar 26, 2018, 5:00 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Grapham Scholarly Commons, Bird Library

Dr. Griselda Rodriguez-Solomon is a mother, Birth Justice Advocate, Professor at the City College of New York, and kundalini yogi. Trained under Ancient Song Doula Services, Griselda’s praxis is grounded in advocacy around the rights of women of color during and after birth. She’s authored a chapter in the anthology Birthing Justice: Black Women, Pregnancy and Childbirth. The home-birth of her sun Talib transformed her life. 

Village Birth International advocates for respectful maternity care. Founded in 2006, VBI engages maternal health models that work for families and carry a wide-reaching impact on communities. In Syracuse, VBI’s work with women of color, refugees and LGBTQ families also engages the ways systemic racism, national identity, and economic conditions affect birth outcomes and maternal and family well-being.  Download the PDF for details.

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TBA Joel Giedt

Mar 26, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

202 Physics Bldg.

Host: Simon Catterall/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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Dr. Jessica Henty-Ridilla, Upstate

Mar 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Carlos Castaneda

TITLE:  Profilin directly enhances microtubule growth through residues mutated in ALS

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Meet The Scholar Coffee Hour

Mar 26, 2018, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

300 Tolley Humanities Building

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)


Stop by the Humanities Center library for coffee and conversation with this year’s Watson Professor.

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Film Screening: Once Upon a Time in America

Mar 23, 2018, 6:00 PM-10:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Guy Borlee (Il Cinema Ritrovato)

Borlee brings rare prints from the Italian film archive to campus for two nights of film screenings (see also March 22). All are welcome to this rare screening of a restored and expanded print of Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in America.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Colloquia - Alan Hájek

Mar 23, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

107 Hall of Languages

The speaker for this colloquia will be Alan Hájek, Fellow Australian Academy of the Humanities, ANU, Title TBA.

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Contested Ethics, Contesting Institutions: Dialogue on Interdisciplinary Research Practice

Mar 23, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)
Zosha Stuckey (Towson University)
Liat Ben Moshe (University of Toledo)
Cynthia Wu (SUNY Buffalo)

Drawing from Schweik’s work with the International Disability Rights Research Network, an international committee tasked to develop a research ethics protocol for scholarship supporting the goals of the UN Convention on the Rights of Disabled Persons, panelists explore how the principles articulated in this protocol might relate (or not) to historical, humanities, and arts-based research. Panelists will also explore the politics of the archive and research ethics in the context of institutions and carceral contexts.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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TBA Bhaskar Dutta

Mar 23, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Bldg.

Host: Scott Watson/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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TBD by Ann Hermundstad

Mar 23, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 202/204

Host: Lisa Manning | Contact: David Yllanes (dyllanes@syr.edu)

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FilmScreening and Discussion: Rapsodia Satanica

Mar 22, 2018, 8:00 PM-9:30 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Guy Borlee (Il Cinema Ritrovato)

Borlee brings rare prints from the Italian film archive to campus for two nights of film screenings (see also March 23) All are welcome to this free screening of Rapsodia Satanica (1917) followed by a panel discussion about film history and archives.

This working group event is supported by the CNY Humanities Corridor.

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Dialogue in Bringing together Asian International and Asian-American Students

Mar 22, 2018, 5:30 PM-7:00 PM

114 Bird Library

You are welcome to join a dialogue on building an inclusive community and bringing together Asian international and Asian American students. Food and Drink will be provided.

Yingyi Ma, yma03@syr.edu, 314.443.3716

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Black Feminism, Coalition Building and the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

Mar 22, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

319 Sims Hall

Barbara Smith is an author, activist, and independent scholar who has played a groundbreaking role in opening up a national cultural and political dialogue about the intersections of race, class, sexuality, and gender.  She was among the first to define an African American women’s literary tradition and to build Black women’s studies and Black feminism in the United States.  She has been politically active in many movements for social justice since the 1960s.

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Testing the Hydrogen Bomb: A Status Report by Emlyn Hughes

Mar 22, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Paul Souder / Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

In the 1940s and 1950s, the United States performed 67 nuclear weapon tests in the Marshall Islands, including the detonation of the largest US thermonuclear weapon (15 megatons), named Castle Bravo. Seventy years later, the impact of these tests on the Marshallese people is still apparent. The more recent challenge of rising sea levels, coupled with the remaining nuclear waste represents a particularly chilling problem. In this talk, we will discuss our recent work on this topic, as well as future plans.

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Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It

Mar 21, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

In 1939, a popular science magazine trumpeted, "Dull Babies Made Normal By Feeble-Minded Girls’ Care: Increase of as Much as 40 Points in IQ Reported.” The article described an experiment by psychologist Harold Skeels in which orphanage toddlers were transferred to the State Institution for the “Mentally Defective” in Glenwood, Iowa to be nurtured by women incarcerated there. Other “contrast” children left behind in the orphanage did worse by any measure. Raising the children in tandem with low-wage women workers who were their attendants, the women of Glenwood developed a radically interdependent kinship model that profoundly (but briefly, and under conditions of domination) called into question the usual terms and stratifications of intelligence, normalcy, cure, and care.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) will be provided at this public lecture.


This event is part of the Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities series with its theme for 2018: Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement and Incarceration.


Additional Supporters
:

Additional Supporters:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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T.J. Jarrett Reading

Mar 21, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

T.J. Jarrett was awarded the 2017 George Garrett New Writing Award by the Fellowship of Southern Writers. She is the author of "Zion", winner of the Crab Orchard Open Competition, and "Ain't No Grave", a finalist for the 2013 Balcones Prize.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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T.J. Jarrett in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Mar 21, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Jarrett is a writer and software developer in Nashville, Tennessee.  

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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Welcome Reception for Susan Schweik

Mar 20, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

Join us in celebrating this year's Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor, Susan Schweik. (ASL translation provided at this social event.)

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Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities residency begins

Mar 20, 2018, 4:30 PM-6:00 PM

Dates/Times/Locations vary. See the listings below.

Susan Schweik (University of California, Berkeley)

This year's Watson Distinguished Visiting Professor is Susan Schweik. During her residency (March 19-30), Schweik engages students, faculty, and community members in various discussions and activities under an overarching theme of "Bodies of Evidence: Documenting/Representing Injustice, Confinement, and Incarceration."

Click to download a sharable, printable flier.

Tuesday, March 20, 4:30-6 p.m.
Welcome Reception for Susan Schweik
Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center

Wednesday, March 21, 4:30-6 p.m.
Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don't Know It
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Friday, March 23, Noon-1:30 p.m.
Contested Ethics, Contesting Institutions: Dialogue on Interdisciplinary Research Practice
Peter Graham Scholar Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Monday, March 26, 10:30-11:30 a.m
Meet the Scholar Coffee Hour
300 Tolley Humanities Building (Sainsbury Library)

Tuesday, March 27, 4-5:30p.m.
Here the Diaries End: Intellectual Disability and the Ends of Life Writing
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Thursday, March 29, 4:30-6 p.m.
Disability Justice in the Archives
Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, Room 114 Bird Library

Friday, March 30, Noon-2 p.m.
The Poetics of Confinement: A Workshop
Special Collections Research Center (SCRC), Lemke Seminar Room, 6th floor, Bird Library


BIOGRAPHY: Susan Schweik is Professor of English at the University of California Berkeley, where she has worked since 1984. She is the author of The Ugly Laws: Disability in Public (NYU, 2009) and A Gulf So Deeply Cut: American Women Poets and the Second World War (1991) and is completing a book tentatively titled Unfixed: How the Women of Glenwood Changed American IQ, and Why We Don’t Know It.  She served as Associate Dean of Arts and Humanities at UCB from 2007-2015 and has just returned to that position.  She is a recipient of Berkeley’s Chancellor's Award for Advancing Institutional Excellence and its Distinguished Teaching Award, and the University of California’s Presidential Chair in Undergraduate Education. Schweik has been involved with the development of disability studies at Berkeley for over twenty years. She was co-coordinator of the Ed Roberts Fellowships in Disability Studies post-doctoral program at Berkeley (coordinated by the Institute for Urban and Regional Development). She is co-founder and co-director of Berkeley’s Disability Studies minor and has been very actively involved in the advanced Disability Studies Research Cluster in Berkeley’s Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society.


The 2018 Watson Professor residency is hosted by Beth Ferri (Professor of Inclusive Education and Disability Studies) and Michael Gill (Assistant Professor of Disability Studies) in the School of Education.

The Jeannette K. Watson Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the Humanities is a preeminent lectureship originally established by the Watson family to support on-campus residencies of prominent humanities scholars, writers, and artists.

Additional Supporters:

  • School of Education
  • David B. Falk College of Sport & Human Dynamics
  • Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
  • Center on Human Policy, Legacy Fund for Disability Studies and Human Policy
  • Disability Cultural Center
  • Department of English & Textual Studies
  • Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition
  • Cultural Foundations of Education (CFE)
  • Department of Sociology
  • Department of History
  • Department of Women’s & Gender Studies
  • SU Bookstore
  • SU Libraries & Special Collections Research Center

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Alaji Bah, Ph.D., SUNY Upstate Medical University

Mar 20, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Center for Science and Technology (CST), Room 1-019

Hosted by Dr. Castaneda

More infomraiton about this week's presenter can be found here.

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Language Assistant Position at the Université de Strasbourg

Mar 19, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:00 PM

Apply by March 19th

Applications are invited for a language assistant position at the Université de Strasbourg.

Applicants must be native speakers of English and hold a BA in the humanities or social sciences. All students with a French language proficiency at the 200-level are encouraged to apply.

Besides teaching conversation and writing classes to intermediate and advanced students, an assistant’s work includes class material preparation, administrative duties and academic advising. The assistant will join a team of four other assistants, working together under the guidance of faculty members.

The workload amounts to 300 hours for the academic year, which begins in September and ends in mid-July. On average, an assistant teaches eight classes per week.

Language assistants receive a monthly salary of 1.214 Euros. This covers living expenses (housing, food and transportation). Language assistants are covered by the French public health insurance scheme (sécurité sociale).

Strasbourg is a city that has much to offer: it is the seat of European institutions and the capital of a region with a distinct culture. Located on the German border, it is close to other European cities such as Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Basel or Zurich. Paris is less than two hours away by train. For more information, please write to Ghislain Potriquet (potriquet@unistra.fr). 

By Monday, March 19, interested applicants must submit a letter of intent in French; a CV in French; a transcript; and one letter of recommendation.

Please bring or e-mail application materials to Mrs. Colleen Kepler, cdkepler@syr.edu, 340 H.B. Crouse Hall, 315-443-2175. 

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TBD by Elisabeth Agoritsas

Mar 16, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 202/204

Host: Lisa Manning | Contact: David Yllanes (dyllanes@syr.edu)

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Communicating with Alumni

Mar 9, 2018, 1:00 PM-1:30 PM

201 Hall of Languages

Do's & Don'ts Workshop

Join us to learn more about the do's and don'ts when connecting with alumni.

For more information, please email Sue Casson at smcasson@syr.edu

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Akin: Embedding as Artistic Strategy in the Experimental Video of Eva Maria Rødbro & Keren Shavit

Mar 8, 2018, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

Watson Theater, 316 Waverly Avenue

Eva Marie Rødbro (Copenhagen)
Keren Shavit (Brooklyn, NY)

Urban Video Project (UVP) presents AKIN, an evening of work by experimental video artists Keren Shavit and Eva Marie Rødbro, featuring hybrid documentaries in which the filmmakers insert themselves into the intimate interactions of an American family; followed by Q&A and a reception with the artists.

Please note, the event will be held in Watson Theater on the SU campus.

Additional support comes from the Department of Transmedia


ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES:

Keren Shavit is a mixed media artist and curator, living and working in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem and was a selected participant in the documentary workshop at the Leon Schiller National Higher School of Film in Lodz and Sam Spiegel Film School, Jerusalem. Shavit has exhibited, published and screened her work in Israel, New York, Poland, Germany, China, Norway, and Iceland.

Eva Marie Rødbro is a photographer and award-winning maker of short films that explore youth culture in a variety of contexts. She was educated at art academies in Denmark and the Netherlands. Her most recent short We Chose the Milky Way (2015) screened at the 2016 International Film Festival of Rotterdam and at the 2016 Ann Arbor Film Festival, where it won the George Manupelli Founder’s Spirit Award. Her 2010 short, I Touched Her Legs, won The Barbara Aronofsky Latham Award for Emerging Experimental Video Artist at the 49th Ann Arbor Film Festival, Most Inventive Film Award at the Odense Film Festival 2011, and was nominated for the NEW:VISION award CPH:DOX 2010.

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Benjamin Black (CCNY)

Mar 8, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2017/2018 K.D. Nelson coordinator.

 "Resolving the Flood Basalt Carbon Quandary"

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Communicating with Alumni

Mar 7, 2018, 11:00 AM-11:30 AM

108 Maxwell

Do's & Don'ts Workshop

Join us to learn more about the do's and don'ts when connecting with alumni.

For more information, please email Sue Casson at smcasson@syr.edu

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Upstate Medical University Pre-Admission Advisement

Mar 6, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall

College of Medicine

Students interested in the College of Medicine may attend a Medical College Information Session which is held on the First Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am in Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall. Students can register on-line or call the admissions office to register for this session.

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Design + Activism: Jayne Zweiman, Pussyhat Co-founder

Mar 5, 2018, 5:00 PM-6:30 PM

Slocum Hall

Designer and artist Jayna Zweiman’s work engages contemporary issues of gender, representation, and how political activism can foster collective engagement. She is one of the co-founders of the Pussyhat Project, which became an icon for the Women’s March in January 2016. This grassroots movement created a ‘sea of pink’ in every city a march was held, creating a visible solidarity for all participants. Zweiman is now working on a new participatory project, Welcome Blanket, focusing on issues of immigration and refugee resettlement. Formally trained as an architect, Zweiman will discuss the influences her architectural and material education have had on her work and its trajectories.

Additional supporters:

1. Geography
2. VPA School of Art
3. Architecture
4. Women's and Gender Studies

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Career Workshop sponsored by ETS

Mar 5, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

500 Hall of Languages

Find out what careers you can pursue with an ETS degree.  Network with successful English majors.  Hear presentations from:

  • Daryl Bunyan '16, Shakespeare actor
  • Sue Casson, Career Development and Services in the College of Arts and Sciences
  • Sam Mettler ’92, Emmy Award-winning writer
  • Keith Newvine G’08, high-school English chair
  • Santiago Quiñones ’90, Hollywood producer

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Career Workshop

Mar 5, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

500 Hall of Languages

Find out what careers you can pursue with an ETS degree.  Network with successful English majors.  Hear presentations from:

  • Daryl Bunyan '16, Shakespeare actor
  • Sue Casson, Career Development and Services in the College of Arts and Sciences
  • Sam Mettler ’92, Emmy Award-winning writer
  • Keith Newvine G’08, high-school English chair
  • Santiago Quiñones ’90, Hollywood producer

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Colloquia - William Starr

Mar 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-6:30 PM

500 Hall of Languages

Colloquia are typically held on Friday afternoons, and are followed by a reception in HL 538.

The speaker for this colloquia will be William Starr, Associate Professor, Cornell University, "Norms of Communication".

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Benvenuti al Nord by Luca Miniero

Mar 2, 2018, 3:00 PM-5:00 PM

Hall of Languages 107

Join us for the screening of "Benvenuti al Nord" by Luca Miniero as part of the Italian Film Series of 2018. The screening will take place in Hall of Languages 107. Pizza and drinks will be provided!

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REAL Talks: Economic Injustice

Mar 2, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

In a political climate that continues to encourage exclusionary rhetoric and practices, university communities have to grapple with what it means to be truly committed to creating spaces of inclusion and belonging. The nation’s reckoning (or lack thereof) with racial and gendered violence, economic crisis, exclusionary immigration and foreign policies, and social unrest has directly affected university communities, while raising questions about the responsibilities institutions of higher education have in these issues.

Three "Resisting Exclusion through Activism and Leadership" sessions -- or "REAL Talks" -- are scheduled for February, March, and April (locatons vary), each addressing a different theme:

  • State Violence (February 9), moderated by Biko Mandela Gray, to include topics of policing, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, immigration control, and DACA
  • Economic Injustice (March 2), moderated by Susan Thomas, covering economic matters affecting the student body including student debt, tuition hikes, the GOP tax bill, and the overall neoliberalization of higher education
  • Rape Culture (April 20), moderated by Chris Eng, discussing the prevalence of rape, assault, and harassment on campuses, the significance of the #metoo movement and the Title IX crisis

These lunchtime dialogues are organized and moderated by faculty organizers from Cultural Foundations of Education, Religious Studies, and English with input from existing SU student organizations working to addressing these specific forms of exclusion. Download the printable/sharable poster.

Due to limited seating, please RSVP to Susan Thomas by February 22; include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

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The Politics of Gender & Islam: New Approaches in Middle East and South Asian Studies

Mar 2, 2018, 10:00 AM-2:00 PM

Kilian Room, 500 Hall of Languages

Begum Adalet (Cornell University)
Carol Babiracki (Syracuse University)
Amy Kallander (Syracuse University)
Natalie Khazaal (Texas A&M)
Katherine Lemons (McGill University)
Chandra Mohanty (Syracuse University)
Fareen Parvez (UMass, Amherst)
Farhana Sultana (Syracuse University)

The Middle Eastern Studies Program’s Spring Symposium is a two-part interdisciplinary exploration of the politics of gender, Islam, and Islamophobia. This first gathering features exciting research by scholars from the United States and Canada in conversation with Syracuse faculty members. The Spring Symposium continues with a second discussion on March 30.


Additional supporters:

  • History Department
  • International Relations Department
  • Maxwell School
  • Religion Deptartment
  • South Asian Center
  • Women and Gender Studies
  • Sociology Department

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Shared Governance

Mar 1, 2018, 2:30 PM-4:00 PM

214 Slocum Hall

A conversation with Chancellor Kent Syverud of Syracuse University and Dr. Christopher Newfield of UC Santa Barbara.  The event will be moderated by Dr. Crystal Bartolovich from the Department of English, Syracuse University.

This event is sponsored by the Future Professoriate Program, the Graduate School, the Department of English, and the English Graduate Organization.

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Tarfia Faizullah Reading

Feb 28, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Tarfia Faizullah's debut poetry collection, "Seams", won a VIDA Award, the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award, the Milton Kessler First Book Award and the Drake University Emerging Writers Award. She has also recieved numerous awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship, the Pushcart Prizes and the Frederick Bock Prize from Poetry.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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Tarfia Faizullah in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Feb 28, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Faizullah is recipient of multiple awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship, three Pushcart Prizes and the Frederick Bock Prize from Poetry. 

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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Spoken Word and Activism: Signature Soul

Feb 28, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Music and Activism in Syracuse: A Music & Discussion Series

This event series explores how local artists in Central New York use music to accomplish political ends in our local communities. From critiquing policy to fostering democratic participation, reaching out to oppressed groups or working with refugee children to tell their own stories, these musicians draw from deeply-rooted, culturally specific forms of music and performance to connect with others, improve their world, and expand answers to the question of who “belongs” in Syracuse, New York, and the USA.  The series of discussions will combine short music performances with Q&A sessions facilitated and led by students from Professor Sydney Hutchinson’s spring course, HOM 400 – Music and Activism.

Sessions are free and open to all, on these last Wednesdays of the month:

  •     February 28, "Spoken Word and Activism: Signature Soul"
  •     March 28, "Musical Theater and Activism: Dream Freedom Resistance"
  •     April 25, "Latin American Music and Activism: Colleen Kattau"
Additional supporters:
  1.    Art and Music Histories
  2.    Latino and Latin American Studies
  3.    Women’s and Gender Studies

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Vocal Master Class with Tracy Hamlin

Feb 26, 2018, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

Community Folk Art Center, 805 East Genesee Street, Syracuse

Internationally renowned jazz, soul, and R&B artist Tracy Hamlin concludes her Syracuse visit with a special master class designed to help singers of all ages and backgrounds find their voice. Interested participants should prepare a solo from the Great American Songbook or pop/soul repertoire. Please bring two copies of the lead sheet or keyboard accompaniment, or a mobile phone audio file. Hamlin will briefly work with each singer in front of a small audience, focusing on sound, technique and overall performance. Spectators are welcome!

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, or to register for the limited number of student slots, please contact cfac@syr.edu as soon as possible, and include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

NOTE: Tracy will also be part of a panel discussion / performance on campus, February 26th, from Noon-1:30.


Additional supporters for Hamlin's visit:
CNY Jazz
College of Arts & Sciences
Community Folk Art Center
Department of Art & Music Histories

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Multimessenger astrophysics with numerical relativity by David Radice

Feb 26, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof.Duncan Brown/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

How are neutron stars formed and what is inside them? What is the  engine powering short gamma-ray bursts? What is the astrophysical site  of production of heavy elements? Multimessenger observations of compact binary coalescence and core-collapse supernovae might provide  us with the key to answer these and other important open questions in theoretical astrophysics. However, multimessenger astronomy also poses  new challenges to the theorists who need to develop models for the  joint interpretation of all data channels. In this talk, I will  present recent theoretical results. I will review the landmark multimessenger observation of merging neutron stars, and I will discuss its interpretation and implication in the light of results from first-principles simulations. Finally, I will discuss future challenges and prospective for this nascent field.

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Music, Identity, and Belonging

Feb 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:30 PM

Peter Graham Room, 114 Bird Library

Tracy Hamlin (Singer, songwriter)
Kal Alston
(Community Folk Art Center), moderator
Theo Cateforis (Art & Music Histories)
Jeff Welcher (Visual & Performing Arts)

Renowned jazz and R&B singer, songwriter, recording artist, producer and music entrepreneur, Tracy Hamlin joins this panel of scholars in conversation to explore connections between music and identity, reflect on how music can promote social/cultural understanding, and to examine how music draws on diverse cultural histories, especially through new technology.

Best known for her work with Pieces of a Dream and Gloria Gaynor, Hamlin's visit to Syracuse includes a CNY Jazz sponsored performance Sunday at the historic Marriott Syracuse Downtown (see info below) and a Master Class opportunity on Monday afternoon.

SUNDAY CONCERT (4-8 p.m., 2/25/18)
Eric Darius and Tracy Hamlin
Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga Street, Syracuse
For information, please call 315-479-5299 or email Cathleen O'Brien.

BIOGRAPHY:
Tracy Hamlin began her singing career at age eleven, at the La Fonatine Bleu in Washington DC. She has been traveling the globe as a singer ever since. Her technique is grounded on a substantial education. Hamlin developed classical proficiency and dexterity; learning to sing in French, German, and Italian at the Baltimore School of the Arts and the Peabody Preparatory School of Music.

She has performed with numerous music legends including Carlos Santana, Marcus Miller, Jonathan Butler, and Chaka Khan. She has also toured internationally as lead background vocalist for Gloria Gaynor. She toured internationally as the lead vocalist with the legendary jazz group Pieces of a Dream, and was featured on their Love’s Silhouette (2002) and No Assembly Required (2005) albums.

Hamlin has self-executive produced three solo albums through her own label, DMH Records, LLC: Seasons (2005), Better Days (2009), and This is My Life (2013), which debuted in June 2013, and immediately gained the attention of music lovers globally, hitting the #1 position on the UK Soul Charts.

Tracy teamed up with DJ Spen in 2012 to release a string of successful “house music” singles including “Drive Me Crazy” and “Never Too Much”, #1 downloads on Traxsource, and “Got To Be Strong” a top 10 download. The success of these house singles led to Tracy’s signing with Quantize Recordings. On this label, Tracy has crossed boundaries between Soul, Jazz, R&B and House Music. She has collaborated on Quantize Records with DJ Spen (US), Frank McComb (US), John Khan & Earl TuTu (UK) and Michele Chiavarini (UK).

Tracy Hamlin continually performs at a myriad of venues and festivals. She aspires to continue her development and growth as an artist, and to mentor a new generation of vocalists.


Additional supporters:
CNY Jazz
College of Arts & Sciences
Community Folk Art Center
Department of Art & Music Histories

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Dr. Heidi Hehnly-Chang, Upstate Medical University

Feb 26, 2018, 12:00 PM-1:00 PM

106 Life Sciences Complex (Lundgren Room)

HOST:  Dr. Jessica MacDonald

TITLE:  Cell Cycle Dependent Mechanisms Governing Tissue Morphogenesis

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Hairy Interfaces by Alice Nasto

Feb 23, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 202/204

Host: Joey Paulsen | Contact: David Yllanes (dyllanes@syr.edu)

 Textured surfaces are known to play an important role in water-repellency and uptake for a number of creatures. While the influence of chemistry and surface roughness on the wettability of surfaces has been studied extensively, little is known about the role of larger objects such as hairs. Our work is directed towards rationalizing the benefits gained from hairy textures through a combined experimental and theoretical approach. 

First, we are motivated by semi-aquatic mammals, who rely on fur for insulation underwater. We investigate the mechanism of dynamic air entrainment for hairy surfaces plunged in liquid. Hairy surfaces that are fabricated using laser cut molds and casting samples with PDMS are plunged into a fluid bath. Modeling the hairy texture as a network of capillary tubes, the imbibition speed of water into the hairs is obtained through a balance of hydrostatic pressure and viscous stress. The maximum diving depth that can be achieved before the hairs are wetted to the roots is predicted from a comparison of the diving speed and imbibition speed. 

Second, motivated by nectar-drinking animals with hairy tongues, we investigate the reverse scenario, where a hairy surface is withdrawn from a bath of fluid, emerging with viscous liquid entrained in the hairy texture. The drainage of the liquid trapped between the texture is modeled using a Darcy-Brinkmann like approach. The amount of fluid that is entrained depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the density of the hairs, and the withdrawal speed. Both theory and experiments show that there is an optimal hair density to maximize fluid uptake. 

Finally, we investigate drop impact on hairy surfaces. By varying the speed of the drop at impact and the spacing of the hairs, we observe a variety of behaviors. For dense hairs and low impact velocity, the liquid drop sits on top of the hair, similar to a Cassie-Baxter state. For higher impact velocity, and intermediate to high density of hairs, the drops penetrate through the surface, but the hairs resist their spreading. For low hair density and high impact velocity, the drops penetrate and eject droplets upon impact. 

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Andrew Smye (Penn State University)

Feb 22, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

Heroy 113

Jay Thomas is the 2017/2018 K.D. Nelson coordinator.

 “Mineral Scale Constraints on the Geodynamics of Continental Extension”

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La Table Française

Feb 16, 2018, 2:30 PM-3:00 PM

HBC 213A

La Table Française gives you an opportunity to practice French in an informal, fun atmosphere.

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Teatro la María Theater group Workshop

Feb 16, 2018, 1:00 PM-4:00 PM

500 Hall of Languages

The actors, playwright, and director of Chilean theater group, Teatro La María, will conduct a workshop: Dramaturgias en Diálogo y Variaciones de "La Vida es Sueño". (mostly in Spanish, but bilingual)

RSVP to  Gail Bulman <gabulman@syr.edu>

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Applications due by February 15!

Feb 15, 2018, 11:59 PM-11:59 PM

How to apply for Fall 2018

The application cycle for Fall 2018 opened on August 2, 2017 and will close on February 15, 2018. All applicants must apply through the Communication Sciences & Disorders Centralized Application Service (CSDCAS) and all supporting documents must be sent to CSDCAS.

Here is a detailed document explaining the Application Instructions.

Contact the CSD office for questions: csd@syr.edu

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CEU Seminar

Feb 15, 2018, 5:30 PM-8:15 PM

Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel

Syracuse University is pleased to sponsor a .25 CEU Seminar on Thursday, February 15th. The course will provide an overview of diagnostic profiles and clinical tasks used to differentiate preschool and school-age children with childhood apraxia of speech, dysarthria, phonological disorders, and articulation disorders. See the flyer for details.  

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Women's Roles in Latin American Theater

Feb 15, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

304 Tolley Humanities Building

Gail Bulman E-Mail: gabulman@syr.edu

The actors and director of Teatro La Maria meet with interested students, faculty and the general public to discuss women's roles as playwrights, directors and actors in Chilean and Latin American theater. Part of the conversation focuses on how their theater has raised consciousness about discrimination and corruption and fostered social change. Space is limited; please RSVP to Gail Bulman by February 5. Include any requests for accessibility accommodations.

This talk is a presentation of this semester's Syracuse Symposium course, (SPA 400) Women, the Arts, and Social Change in Latin America.

(Humanities)

Mira Jacob Reading

Feb 14, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Mira Jacob, the Spring 2018 Visiting Writer for the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, is the author of the novel "The Sleepwalker's Guide to Dancing: A Novel". The book was honored by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, longlisted for the Brooklyn Literary Eagles Prize, was a Barnes & Noble Discover New Writers pick, among other honors.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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Mira Jacob in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Feb 14, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Jacob is the Spring 2018 Visiting Writer for the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing.   

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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Upstate Medical University Pre-Admission Advisement

Feb 6, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall

College of Medicine

Students interested in the College of Medicine may attend a Medical College Information Session which is held on the First Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am in Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall. Students can register on-line or call the admissions office to register for this session.

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Rapper A.D. Carson to Visit Syracuse Feb. 5 for Black History Month

Feb 5, 2018, 5:00 PM-7:00 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons (114 Bird Library)

The University observes Black History Month with a visit by A.D. Carson, a hip-hop scholar who created a popular rap album to defend his Ph.D. dissertation at Clemson University.

Carson, assistant professor of hip-hop and the global South at the University of Virginia (UVA), will discuss “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes and Revolutions” on Monday, Feb. 5, at 5 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons (114 Bird Library). The event is free and open to the public.

Ada Limon Reading

Jan 31, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse Hall

Ada Limon is the author of four books of poetry, including "Bright Dead Things", "Lucky Wreck", "This Big Fake World: A Story in Verse", and "Sharks in the Rivers". Her book "Bright Dead Things" was named a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award for Poetry, the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, and the 2015 National Books Critics Circle Award. It was also named one of the Top Ten Poetry Books of the Year by the New York Times.

Readings begin at 5:30pm in Gifford Auditorium and are preceded by a question and answer session from 3:45pm - 4:40pm. Open to the public.

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Ada Limón in the Raymond Carver Reading Series

Jan 31, 2018, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

HBC Gifford Auditorium

Limón is the author of four books of poetry, including “Bright Dead Things” (Milkweed Editions, 2015).   

For more information see the Raymond Carver Reading Series article in SU News.

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College of Engineering and Computer Science Spring Fair

Jan 31, 2018, 3:00 PM-7:00 PM

Goldstein Auditorium, Schine Student Center

Contact: Karen Davis, kmdavi01@syr.edu 

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Hearing Screenings and Information on Hearing Loss

Jan 31, 2018, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Fayetteville Senior Center

Dr. Joseph Pellegrino and Doctoral Student Clinicians will be at the Fayetteville Senior Center giving a talk on hearing loss and hearing aid options. They will also be conducting free hearing screenings.

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iSchool Spring Career Fair

Jan 31, 2018, 10:00 AM-2:00 PM

Goldstein Auditorium, Schine Student Center

Contact: Kathy Benjamin: kabenjam@syr.edu 

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Student Veteran & Employer Networking Reception

Jan 30, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

The Genesee Grande Hotel

Contact: Jennifer Pluta, jrpluta@syr.edu 

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Whitman Spring Career Fair

Jan 30, 2018, 4:00 PM-7:00 PM

Goldstein Auditorium, Schine Student Center

Contact: Sue Clayton, srclay01@syr.edu 

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Coffee Chat with Economics Majors

Jan 30, 2018, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM

220 Eggers Hall

Contact Sue Casson: smcasson@syr.edu

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Syracuse University Spring Career Fair

Jan 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-7:00 PM

Goldstein Auditorium, Schine Student Center

Contact: Shawna Lawrence: slawrence@syr.edu

Global Game Jam 2018

Jan 26, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:00 PM

Blackstone Launchpad, Bird Library

John Sanders, jwsan100@syr.edu

This weekend, January 26th-28th, Syracuse University's Bird Library will play host to game designers from across the Syracuse community as they take on the ultimate challenge: creating a game in 48 hours!

Games may be digital or analog, so long as they draw from a secret theme revealed at the event. The best games will be awarded prizes by judges from the local game community, including designers from Lake Effect Games and PowerSpike.

Meals and prototyping materials will be provided, and you can make teams on site — just bring your creativity and get ready to make games!

The kick-off event starts Friday, January 26th, at 4:00pm in the Blackstone Launchpad, Bird Library. Open to the community!

Register now at gamejam.syr.edu!

Sponsored by the Computer Art and Animation Program; the Department of English; the Syracuse University Librariesl the Department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition; the School of Information Studies; Syracuse University Information Technology and Services. Powered by the Blackstone Launchpad, Syracuse University.

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Humanities Center Dissertation Fellows Research Presentation

Jan 26, 2018, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Tolley 304

Learn more about the research of the Humanities Center’s 2017-18 Dissertation Fellows. Coffee and light breakfast available! 

Maria Carson
Ph.D. Candidate, Religion

Gender as an Affective Tool in the Thought of Abraham Joshua Heschel

Women are not explicitly discussed in Abraham Joshua Heschel’s 1951 work,The Sabbath. However, a particular kind of affective femininity is central to his larger argument about (Jewish) ritual time and space. This conception of gender as an affective technology illustrates how women in 1950s Jewish America were increasingly concerned with “marketing” Judaism to children and the broader community. Carson argues that to understand this cultural context is to understand how Heschel's work was impacted by the larger American Jewish socio-political landscape. 

T.J. West III
Ph.D. Candidate, English

Paradise Lost: Melancholic Utopia and the Experience of History in Cleopatra

In the filmCleopatra(1963), viewers get a sense of hopeful mourning for a brighter future that the film never brings to fruition. The film’s narrative, driven toward failure, suffuses time-stopping, utopian spectacles with the despair of inevitable historical decline. West argues thatCleopatraexpresses the profound uncertainties of a Cold War American culture struggling to find its place in history in a time when the future seemed uncertain due the ever-present possibility of atomic war. 

T.J. West III, tjwestii@syr.edu 

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Career Fair Prep Workshop

Jan 24, 2018, 11:00 AM-11:30 AM

108 Maxwell Hall

Get career fair ready by attending this workshop!

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Upstate Medical University Pre-Admission Advisement

Jan 2, 2018, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall

College of Medicine

Students interested in the College of Medicine may attend a Medical College Information Session which is held on the First Tuesday of every month at 11:00 am in Room 1213 Weiskotten Hall. Students can register on-line or call the admissions office to register for this session.

Grand Rounds Speaker George J. Annas

Dec 14, 2017, 12:30 PM-2:00 PM

Grand Rounds area, 2nd Floor, 713 Harrison Street

Grand Rounds
Sponsored by the Department of Psychiatry, Upstate Medical University
"Should we use Gene Editing to Make a 'Better Baby'"?
Presented by George J. Annas, JD, MPH
Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Boston University
Grand Rounds area, 2nd Floor 713, Harrison Street
Thursday, December 14, 12:30-2 p.m.

Description: There is consensus that treating and preventing disease could be a legitimate use of the gene editing technique CRISPR. But what about using gene editing to “improve” the species, or at least try to make a “better baby”? Should the threat of neoeugenics give us pause, or should we treat improving our children’s genes just like any other elective procedure—available to those who can afford it?

This talk is open to the public.

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Medical Sciences Lecture Series with Dr. ElBayadi - Anesthesiologist

Dec 6, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Life Sciences Complex, Room 106

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The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes novelist Angela Flournoy

Dec 6, 2017, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes novelist Angela Flournoy on Wednesday, December 6th. The reading starts at 5:30 p.m. in Gifford Auditorium with a Q&A beginning at 3:45. The event is free and open to the public.

Angela Flournoy is the Jane and Daniel Present Lecturer in the College of Arts and Sciences. She is the author of The Turner House (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016), a finalist for the National Book Award and a New York Times notable book of the year. The novel was also a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction and an NAACP Image Award.
Flournoy was a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” Honoree for 2015. Her fiction has appeared in the Paris Review, and she has written for the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic and The New York Times.

A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Flournoy received her undergraduate degree from the University of Southern California. She has taught at the University of Iowa, The New School and Columbia University.

Flournoy is currently the Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellow at the New York Public Library Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

The Raymond Carver Reading Series is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Syracuse University Library Associates, Stephen King, the Dr. Scholl Foundation, the Lynn & David Pleet ’53 Fund for Creative Writing, the Richard Elman Visiting Writer Fund, the Friends of Creative Writing, Chris Tennyson, Jerome Cohen, Jane and Daniel Present, Don McNaughton, and the Interdisciplinary Fund for the Humanities from Leonard and Elise Elman.

Nana Adjei-Brenyah, nkadjeib@syr.edu 

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Connecting with Alumni - Do's and Dont's

Dec 1, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Connecting with Alumni - Do's and Dont's

Nov 29, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

National Expert on Drug Addiction Opens Addiction Symposium

Nov 29, 2017, 9:00 AM-11:00 AM

Upstate Medical University, Medical Alumni Auditorium of Weiskotten Hall

One of the nation’s foremost authorities on drug addiction will address the nation’s opioid epidemic in a special video cast to be screened by Upstate Medical University Nov. 28 at 9 a.m. in the Medical Alumni Auditorium of Weiskotten Hall. Nora D. Volkow, MD, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health who is known for her research demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain, will present an hour-long presentation of the opioid epidemic. The presentation is open to the public.

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"The Arts of Making Life Work among Korean Radiation Sufferers"

Nov 15, 2017, 3:45 PM-5:00 PM

Hall of Languages, Room 207

Please join us for his lecture and welcome Joshua Pilzer (Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Toronto)

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Spanish and the Cultures of Spain, Colombia and Mexico

Nov 10, 2017, 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

HL 105

Spanish and the Cultures of Spain, Colombia and Mexico.

Join us for food and conversation, Friday Nov. 10, 2:30 HL 105

 

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LinkedIn, Networking and Online Presence

Nov 10, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Samuel Bronowski “The Art of the Court-Métrage: The Short Film as Satire”

Nov 9, 2017, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Hall of Languages, Room 215

Please join us for two informal conversations where Mr. Samuel Bronswoski, a French-Israeli filmmaker based in New York City, will present his short films, discuss his background growing up in France, England and Israel and his creative process and technique. Refreshments will be provided.  Follow this link to read more... 

Thursday, November 9th, Hall of Languages 215, 7:00-9:00 pm. Discussion will be in English

Friday, Nov. 10th, H.B.C. 213B, 2:30-3:30 pm. Discussion will be in French

Organized by: "La Société Francophone" and the French Program from Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.

Sponsored by: The Student Association and the College of Arts & Sciences

 Bronowski_JPEG

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LinkedIn, Networking and Online Presence

Nov 8, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

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Internships: What, Why, and Where

Nov 3, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Medical Sciences Lecture Series with Dr. Ripich - General Surgeon

Nov 1, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Life Sciences Complex, Room 106

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Internships: What, Why, and Where

Nov 1, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

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Job Search Strategy Workshop

Oct 27, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Where is the Center of the World?

Oct 26, 2017, 2:30 PM-4:45 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons

Please join us for a lecture by Professor Bertand Westphal, from the University of Limoges titled "Where is the Center of the World?" on October 26th at 2:30 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons at Bird Library.

Sponsored by:

Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics; Humanities Center; Department of Geography; Center for European Studies; CNY Humanitites Corridor, Mellon Foundation

For more information follow this link.

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The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes poet Carl Phillips

Oct 25, 2017, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes poet Carl Phillips on Wednesday, October 25. The reading starts at 5:30 p.m. in Gifford Auditorium with a Q&A beginning at 3:45. The event is free and open to the public.

Phillips is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Reconnaissance (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015), Silverchest (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013), Double Shadow (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012), Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986-2006 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007) and Riding Westward (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006). His collection The Rest of Love (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004) won the Theodore Roethke Memorial Foundation Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Male Poetry, and was a finalist for the National Book Award.

His other books include Rock Harbor (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002); The Tether (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001), winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Pastoral (Graywolf Press, 2000), winner of the Lambda Literary Award; From the Devotions (Graywolf Press, 1998), finalist for the National Book Award; Cortége (Graywolf Press, 1995), finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and In the Blood (Northeastern University Press, 1992), winner of the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize.

Phillips’ work has been anthologized in The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry (Vintage Books, 2003), edited by J. D. McClatchy; Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology (St. Martin’s Press, 2002), edited by Helen Vendler; Gay and Lesbian Poetry in Our Time (St. Martin’s Press, 1988); Contemporary American Poetry (Houghton Mifflin, 2001); and The Vintage Book of African American Poetry (Vintage Books, 2000). His poems have also been chosen eight times for the annual Best American Poetry series.

Phillips is also the author of a book of prose, Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Art and Life of Poetry (Graywolf Press, 2004), and the translator of Sophocles’ Philoctetes (Oxford University Press, 2003).

His honors include the 2006 Academy of American Poets Fellowship, an award in literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Pushcart Prize, the Academy of American Poets Prize, induction into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Library of Congress. Phillips served as a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets (2006-12).

The Raymond Carver Reading Series is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Syracuse University Library Associates, Stephen King, the Dr. Scholl Foundation, the Lynn & David Pleet ’53 Fund for Creative Writing, the Richard Elman Visiting Writer Fund, the Friends of Creative Writing, Chris Tennyson, Jerome Cohen, Jane and Daniel Present, Don McNaughton, and the Interdisciplinary Fund for the Humanities from Leonard and Elise Elman.

Nana Adjei-Brenyah, nkadjeib@syr.edu 

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Joe Goodkin The Odyssey: A Folk Opera

Oct 25, 2017, 12:45 PM-2:05 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Jeff Carnes, jscarnes@syr.edu

Join us as we welcome Joe Goodkin who retells Odyssey as part lecture, part musical performance, and part interactive discussion. See more...

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Job Search Strategy Workshop

Oct 25, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

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Inferrable and Partitive Indefinites in Topic Position

Oct 20, 2017, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

HBC 340 G

Please join us for Professor Dr. Klaus von Heusinger's lecture on "Inferrable and partitive indefinites in topic position" on October 20, 2017 at 2:00 p.m in H.B.C. 340G.

Sponsored by: The Linguistics Study Program and the Department of Languages Literatures and Linguistics. 

For more information follow this link.

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Resume and Cover Letter Workshop

Oct 20, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Joe Goodkin The Odyssey: A Folk Opera

Oct 19, 2017, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

Shemin Auditorium, Shaffer Art Building

Join us! and welcome Joe Goodkin as he retells the Odyssey in a contemporary musical mode both the plot and the performance Circumstances of Homer's original oral composition. See more...

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Pietro Frassica; Bringing Theater to Life

Oct 19, 2017, 3:30 PM-5:00 PM

323A H.B.C.

Pietro Frassica, from Princeton University is giving a lecture titled: Bringing Theater into Life: Pirandello’s “Tonight We Improvise”, from Short Story to Theatrical Vision. Please join us on October 19th at 3:30 P.M in H.B.C 323A.

Sponsored by:

Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics; Humanities Center and the Department of Drama.

For more information follow this link

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English Open House

Oct 18, 2017, 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

Hall of Languages 401A

Come to our English Open House! Meet our faculty and learn about the major! Discover careers, scholarships, study abroad, and student groups. Plus — food! games! Everyone welcome!

Billie Trapani, batrapan@syr.edu

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Resume and Cover Letter Workshop

Oct 18, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

French Film Series - Intouchables

Oct 17, 2017, 7:00 PM-10:00 PM

Falk 104

Last chance to enjoy your French Films for the semester! Come join us!

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Life in Sciences Career Fair Prep Workshop

Oct 11, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

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Interviewer Tips Workshop

Oct 6, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

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Medical Sciences Lecture Series with Dr. Shukri - Neurologist

Oct 4, 2017, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM

Life Sciences Complex, Room 106

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Interviewer Tips Workshop

Oct 4, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum

Sep 28, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons- Room 114 - Bird Library

“Belonging to the International: Gender, Sexuality, and Communist Identity during the Spanish Civil War”

Dr. Lisa A. Kirschenbaum Professor of History West Chester University 

Dr. Kirschenbaum will look at a number of small-scale, often intimate stories ... read more. 

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The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes author Noy Holland

Sep 27, 2017, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes author Noy Holland on Wednesday, September 27. The reading starts at 5:30 p.m. in Gifford Auditorium with a Q&A beginning at 3:45. The event is free and open to the public.

Holland’s books include I Was Trying to Describe What It Feels Like: New and Selected Stories (Counterpoint, 2017), Bird (Counterpoint, 2016), Swim for the Little One First (Fiction Collective Two, 2012), What Begins with Bird (Fiction Collective Two, 2005) and Spectacle of the Body (Knopf, 1994). Holland was a recipient of a Massachusetts Cultural Council award for artistic merit and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

She has taught for many years in the M.F.A. Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts, as well as at Phillips Andover and the University of Florida. She serves on the board of directors at Fiction Collective Two. She has published work in Antioch, The Believer, Conjunctions, Glimmer Train, The Kenyon Review, New York Tyrant, NOON, The Quarterly, and Western Humanities Review, among others.

The Raymond Carver Reading Series is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Syracuse University Library Associates, Stephen King, the Dr. Scholl Foundation, the Lynn & David Pleet ’53 Fund for Creative Writing, the Richard Elman Visiting Writer Fund, the Friends of Creative Writing, Chris Tennyson, Jerome Cohen, Jane and Daniel Present, Don McNaughton, and the Interdisciplinary Fund for the Humanities from Leonard and Elise Elman.

Nana Adjei-Brenyah, nkadjeib@syr.edu 

German Election Party

Sep 24, 2017, 12:00 PM-2:30 PM

213A H. B. Crouse Hall

German Election Party - come and join us!

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Career Fair Prep Workshop

Sep 22, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes poet Solmaz Sharif

Sep 20, 2017, 3:45 PM-6:30 PM

Gifford Auditorium, Huntington Beard Crouse

Nana Adjei-Brenyah, nkadjeib@syr.edu

The Raymond Carver Reading Series welcomes poet Solmaz Sharif on Wednesday, September 20. The reading starts at 5:30 p.m. in Gifford Auditorium with a Q&A beginning at 3:45. The event is free and open to the public.

Born in Istanbul to Iranian parents, Solmaz Sharif holds degrees from U.C. Berkeley, where she studied and taught with June Jordan’s Poetry for the People, and New York University. Her work has appeared in The New RepublicPoetryThe Kenyon ReviewjubilatGulf CoastBoston ReviewWitness, and others. The former managing director of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, her work has been recognized with a “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, a winter fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, an NEA fellowship, and a Stegner Fellowship. She has most recently been selected to receive a 2014 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award as well as a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship. She is currently a lecturer at Stanford University. Her first poetry collection, LOOK, published by Graywolf Press in 2016, was a finalist for the National Book Award.

The Raymond Carver Reading Series is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Syracuse University Library Associates, Stephen King, the Dr. Scholl Foundation, the Lynn & David Pleet ’53 Fund for Creative Writing, the Richard Elman Visiting Writer Fund, the Friends of Creative Writing, Chris Tennyson, Jerome Cohen, Jane and Daniel Present, Don McNaughton, and the Interdisciplinary Fund for the Humanities from Leonard and Elise Elman.

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Career Fair Prep Workshop

Sep 20, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

Fall 2017 French Movie-L'Arnacoeur

Sep 19, 2017, 7:00 PM-10:00 PM

Falk 104

Join us for L'Arnacoeur and earn extra credit. Catch our other French Films

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Resume and Cover Letter Workshop

Sep 15, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

111 Hall of Languages

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Resume and Cover Letter Workshop

Sep 13, 2017, 11:00 AM-12:00 AM

113 Eggers

Germany Before the Election 2017: What to Watch

Sep 12, 2017, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

060 Eggers Hall

Jens Alberts, Head of Press and Public Affairs, Counsul, New York Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany 

Join us for a discussion of the German elections scheduled for September, 24th. Jens Alberts will discuss the German election system, the current political situation, as well as placing the German election in the context of larger EU politics. Following these remarks, Professor Glyn Morgan (Political Science) will provide a brief response, with time allotted for Q&A from students.

Recep on immediately following in 225B Eggers Hall. 

FlyerGerman

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First Day of Classes

Aug 28, 2017, 8:30 AM-11:00 PM

Campus wide

Welcome!

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First Day of Classes

Aug 28, 2017, 8:00 AM-11:00 PM

Campus wide

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Orientation for new graduate ETS TAs

Aug 22, 2017, 9:00 PM-5:00 PM

TBA

Harvey Teres

Orientation for new ETS TAs in the PhD program will be held on Tuesday, August 22.

Schedule for English PhD TA Orientation:
9:00-9:30:  Meeting with DGS (location TBD)
9:30-11:00:  Meeting with the fall lecture professors (location TBD)
11:10-11:45: Demos on use of teaching stations (location TBD)
11:50-12:50: Lunch with veteran grad students in the English Library (HL 401A)
12:50-1:50:  Session on effective teaching strategies (location TBD)
2:00-4:00:   Grading Workshop (location TBD)
4:00-5:00:   Session with the humanities librarian on library teaching resources (location TBD)

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Orientation for incoming graduate students

Aug 21, 2017, 10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Hall of Languages 111

Harvey Teres

Orientation for incoming graduate students will be held on Monday, August 21st, 10:30-noon, in HL 111. Faculty will be in attendance to introduce themselves and their upcoming fall and spring courses, and to welcome new students to the program.

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FLTA Orientation 2017

Aug 13, 2017, 8:30 AM-12:00 PM

Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center

Laura Lisnyczyj

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics are happy to welcome you, the 2017 Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTA), to the summer orientation program to be held August 13 - 17, 2017, at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. The program is sponsored by the US Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) as part of the Fulbright Program, the U.S. government's flagship international exchange program, and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The Institute of International Education (IIE) overseeing the administration of the Fulbright FLTA program. For more information, visit http://eca.state.gov/fulbright.  read more...

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PhD Defense Announcement: Staci Stutsman

Jul 13, 2017, 12:30 PM-2:30 PM

320 Hall of Languages

Staci Stutsman's PhD oral examination for her dissertation, “Transgressive Tears: Performance and the Melodramatic Unruly Woman,” will take place on Thursday, July 13, at 12:30pm in Hall of Languages 320. Stutsman's advisor is Steven Cohan, and her co-advisor is Roger Hallas; her committee members include Christopher Hanson, Susan Edmunds, and Cynthia Baron (Department of Department of Theatre and Film, Bowling Green State University). Kendall Phillips (Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies) will chair the examination.

All faculty members and graduate students are encouraged and welcome to attend. This event is open to the university and public community.

International Association for World Englishes Conference

Jun 30, 2017, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA

We would like to welcome you the 22nd IAWE Conference, held at Syracuse University.  SU is a fitting location given the topic of the conference:  the conference will feature lectures and workshops on a broad, interdisciplinary array of topics, including the sub-themes Information Studies, Computer and Electrical Engineering, Linguistic and Cognitive Sciences to International Business, English, Composition and Rhetoric, Media, Global Affairs and Policy Studies.  SU is fortunate to have a diverse and vibrant community of students and faculty, with over 20% of its student body being international, and we are excited to host such a globally-focused event.  We look forward to seeing you here in Syracuse, NY!

IAWE 2017 will be held at Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA, from June 30 - July 2, 2017. The theme is “The local and global contexts of world Englishes”.

For more information, visit the IAWE Conference Website.

LLL Tables

Jan 27, 2017, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

Various

Spanish Table will be held Fridays 2:00 - 3:00pm starting Feb. 2 in HBC 213A for the Spring 2017 semester.
For additional information: Spanish Table Details

Table Française will be held Fridays 2:00 - 3:00pm starting Jan. 27 in HBC 311A for the Spring 2017 semester.
For additional information: French Table Details

Tavola Italiana - Italian Language Table

German-Themed Halloween Party

Oct 30, 2016, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Noble Room, Hendricks Chapel

Karina von Tippelskirch

Join us for the culmination of the German Campus Weeks! for our German-Themed Halloween Party with Video Competition Award (1st prize: iPad) and Costume Prizes!

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Religion department colloquium: William Robert

Oct 20, 2016, 4:00 PM-5:00 PM

private event

Contact: Virginia Burrus